Board of Trustees Board Meetings Board Policies
Attendance Area Info Calendars Cell Equipment Citizens Advisory Committee on Enrollment Questions & Answers About the Citizens Advisory Committtee Community Wellness Taskforce Complaints/Public Input Contact Us Directory District Boundary Maps History Local Control Feature Articles Features Archive News Nondiscrimination Policy Organizational Beliefs Employees of the Year, 2015-2016 Press Releases Publications School Accountability Reports FUHSD Parent Survey
Business Services Enrollment & Residency Food Services Human Resources Maintenance & Operations New Teacher Induction Teaching & Learning Technology Services
High School Campuses College Now Concurrent Enrollment Middle College FUHSD Adult School Summer Academy
Annual Notifications Course Information and Graduation Requirements College & Career Planning Community Advisory Committee Community Links English Learners PTA Council Resources for Parents Resources for Students Special Services Translation Help Intradistrict Council
Measure B Bond Program Measure K Bond Program Citizens' Oversight Committee CEQA History of FUHSD Bonds

Course Selection Guide Text
Print Main Column

Translation help Span.jpgTranslation help Chin.jpg

FUHSD COURSE SELECTION GUIDE: 2014-15

Table of Contents

FUHSD Non-Discrimination Information.. 4

College Admissions.. 6

Community College. 6

Private Universities & Colleges. 6

California State Universities. 8

CSU Subject Requirements. 8

The CSU Eligibility Index. 8

CSU Eligibility Index Table. 9

University Of California. 10

UC Subject Requirements for Admission (as of Fall 2011). 10

College Eligibility for Student Athletes.. 11

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 11

National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). 11

College Admissions Testing.. 12

ACT.. 12

New SAT (formerly SAT I). 12

ACT/SAT Comparison Chart. 13

ACT to SAT Score Conversion Table. 14

SAT II: Subject Tests. 15

PSAT: Preliminary SAT.. 15

TOEFL: Test of English as a Foreign Language. 15

Advanced Placement Exams. 16

Course Descriptions by Content Area.. 17

How to Read the Course Descriptions. 17

Fremont Union High School District Graduation Requirements. 17

UC/CSU Subject Area Designations. 17

Core Subjects.. 18

English.. 19

The Interdisciplinary Program.. 22

English Language Development Program*. 23

Mathematics. 25

The Interdisciplinary Program.. 28

Physical Education.. 29

Specialized Physical Education Courses. 30

Science. 32

The Interdisciplinary Program.. 34

Social Studies/History. 35

The Interdisciplinary Program.. 37

Applied Academics/Career Technical Education.. 38

Business. 39

English Electives. 41

Industrial Technology. 42

Living Skills. 44

Mathematics Electives. 45

Regional Occupational Program (ROP). 46

Visual and Performing Arts.. 50

 

Art. 51

Music. 54

Theater and Performing Arts. 57

World Languages.. 59

Non-Departmental/General Electives.. 61

Guidance & Planning.. 64

The Guidance Program.. 64

Important Guidance Information.. 64

Fremont Union High School District Graduation Requirements. 65

California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). 65

California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE). 65

General Education Development (GED). 65

Educational Options and Special Services.. 66

 

The Fremont Union High School District prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, or marital or parental status.

he Fremont Union High School District Board of Trustees is committed to equal opportunity for all individuals in education.  District programs and activities shall be free from discrimination based on gender, sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, ethnic group identification, marital or parental status, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation or the perception of one or more of such characteristics.  The Board shall promote programs which ensure that discriminatory practices are eliminated in all district activities.

District programs and facilities, viewed in their entirety, shall be in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that the District provides auxiliary aids and services when necessary to afford individuals with disabilities equal opportunity to participate in or enjoy the benefits of a service, program or activity.  These aids and services may include, but are not limited to, qualified interpreters or readers, assistive listening devices, note-takers, written materials, taped test, and Braille or large print materials.

Individuals with disabilities shall notify the Superintendent or principal if they have a disability that requires special assistance or services.  Reasonable notification should be given prior to the school-sponsored function, program or meeting.

The Superintendent or designee shall notify students, parents/guardians, employees, employee organizations and applicants for admission and employment, and sources of referral for applicants about the district’s policy on nondiscrimination.  Such notification shall be included in each announcement, bulletin, catalog, application form or other recruitment material distributed to these groups. (34CFR 104.8, 106.9)

The Superintendent or designee shall also provide information about related complaint procedures.

In compliance with the law, the District’s nondiscrimination policy shall be published in the individual’s primary language to the extent practicable.

Fremont Union High School District Board Policy 0410

College Admissions

 

Community College

Admission to community college requires one of the following: graduating from high school, passing either the General Educational Development (GED) Exam or California High School Proficiency Examination (CHSPE), being at least 18 years of age. At the community college, students can complete the first two years of college and transfer as juniors to 4-year universities, provided they have successfully completed appropriate course work.  Students can also earn AA degrees and certificates in specific vocational areas that will assist them in entering an occupation.  Local community college contact information is listed below:

De Anza College

Evergreen Valley College

Foothill College

21250 Stevens Creek Blvd.

3095 Yerba Buena Road

12345 El Monte Road

Cupertino, CA 95014

San Jose, CA 95135

Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Counseling:  (408) 864-5400

Counseling:  (408) 270-6474

Career Center:  (650) 949-7229

www.deanza.fhda.edu

www.evc.edu

www.foothill.fhda.edu

 

 

 

Mission College

San Jose City College

West Valley College

3000 Mission College Blvd.

2100 Moorpark Avenue

14000 Fruitvale Avenue

Santa Clara, CA 95054

San Jose, CA 95128

Saratoga, CA 95070

Counseling:  (408) 855-5030

Counseling:  (408) 288-3750

Counseling:  (408) 741-2009

www.missioncollege.org

www.sjcc.edu

www.westvalley.edu

 

Private Universities & Colleges

There are hundreds of private (independent) universities and colleges across the country. Students will find great variety among these schools as each offers a unique educational environment. A student’s individual needs and career plans will determine which private university he or she would be best suited for.  While most private universities are relatively small in size, they also differ from public universities in educational emphasis: religious, nonsectarian, community service, career focus, and liberal arts.  For additional information on private universities in California, we recommend visiting http://www.aiccu.edu.

 

How Do Private Universities Make Admissions Decisions?

Private universities vary in terms of selectivity with some having highly selective admission standards and others having a relatively open admissions program. Listed below are key factors involved in admissions decisions:

High School Courses – A strong program of college preparatory courses is recommended beginning as a freshman and continuing through the senior year.

Grades and Class Rank – Private universities look carefully at the grades in academic subjects as well as the number of Honors and AP (Advanced Placement) courses the student took throughout high school. The Fremont Union High School District does not rank students.  Private universities utilize GPAs to infer ranking.

College Entrance Exams – The SAT and/or ACT are used by most private universities.  Some of the more competitive institutions also require the SAT I. We recommend students take these tests during the junior or senior year.  Information regarding test dates and registration may be found on each campus in the high school’s Career Center and on the web (www.collegeboard.org, www.act.org/aap)

Letters of Recommendation – Private universities require letters of recommendation from teachers, counselors, administrators, or community members.

Extra Curricular Activities – Activities in and out of school ― clubs, athletics, music, art, drama, journalism, band, cheerleading, yearbook, alumni ties, and community service ― may also be used in making admissions decisions.

Your Essays or Personal Statements – Short essays are required.

Special Talents and Achievements – Excelling in subject areas or activities and possessing leadership skills are also determining factors in private university admissions.

Cultural or Ethnic Diversity – Most private universities prefer a sampling of students from across the nation and abroad.  Cultural and ethnic diversity are still considered factors in admissions.

Interview Some private universities require or recommend an interview.

California State Universities

The twenty-three campuses of the California State Universities are located in Bakersfield, Channel Islands, Chico, Dominguez Hills, Fresno, Fullerton, Hayward, Humboldt, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Maritime Academy in Vallejo, Monterey Bay, Northridge, Pomona, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, San Marcos, Sonoma, and Stanislaus.

The California State University selects applicants from the top one-third of California’s high school graduates. Admission is based initially on the student’s grade point average and the score on the ACT or SAT. The GPA is based on college prep courses for sophomore and junior years.

To be eligible for admission to the system, but not necessarily to a specific school or program, students with a given GPA must present a minimum corresponding ACT composite or SAT total score (see chart below). The higher the GPA, the lower the test scores may be. Students with a 3.00 or higher GPA are eligible with any score on the entrance examination.  For additional information about CSU, we recommend visiting http://www.csumentor.edu.

 

CSU Subject Requirements

Area

Subject

Years

a.

History and Social Science (including 1 year of U.S. history or 1 semester of U.S. history and 1 semester of civics or American government AND 1 year of social science)

2

b.

English (4 years of college preparatory English composition and literature)

4

c.

Math (4 years is recommended) including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, or higher mathematics (take one each year)

3

d.

Laboratory Science (including 1 biological science and 1 physical science)

2

e.

Language Other than English (2 years of the same language; American Sign Language is applicable)

2

f.

Visual and Performing Arts (dance, drama or theater, music, or visual art)

1

g.

College Preparatory Elective (additional year chosen from the University of California "A-G" list)

1

 

 

The CSU Eligibility Index

The CSU Eligibility Index Table shows the combination of test scores and grade point averages required to meet minimum eligibility requirements. The CSU does not use the SAT Writing section or the ACT Writing score to calculate the CSU Eligibility Index.

You can calculate your eligibility index by multiplying your grade point average by 800 and adding your combined score on the SAT, using the combined scores earned on the critical reading and math sections. The CSU does not use the SAT Writing score for admission purposes. You may use the best score earned in individual test dates. Or, if you took the ACT, multiply your grade point average by 200 and add ten times the ACT composite score. The ACT composite score can be calculated using the best scores earned in individual test dates. ACT Writing score is not considered in the composite score.

If you apply for admission before you graduate from high school, you should compute your GPA using grades earned in a-g courses completed after the 9th grade. Do not include grades you expect to earn in courses during the remainder of 12th grade. 

California high school graduates need a minimum eligibility index of 2900 using the SAT combined score for critical reading and math sections or 694 using the ACT.

 

CSU Eligibility Index Table

Eligibility Index Table for Residents of California or Graduates of California High Schools

GPA

ACT
Score

SAT
Score

GPA

ACT
Score

SAT
Score

GPA

ACT
Score

SAT
Score

3.0 and above qualifies for any score. 

2.99

10

510

2.66

17

780

2.33

23

1040

2.98

10

520

2.65

17

780

2.32

23

1050

2.97

10

530

2.64

17

790

2.31

24

1060

2.96

11

540

2.63

17

800

2.30

24

1060

2.95

11

540

2.62

17

800

2.29

24

1070

2.94

11

550

2.61

18

820

2.28

24

1080

2.93

11

560

2.60

18

820

2.27

24

1090

2.92

11

570

2.59

18

830

2.26

25

1100

2.91

12

580

2.58

18

840

2.25

25

1100

2.90

12

580

2.57

18

850

2.24

25

1110

2.89

12

590

2.56

18

860

2.23

25

1120

2.88

12

600

2.55

19

860

2.22

25

1130

2.87

12

610

2.54

19

870

2.21

26

1140

2.86

13

620

2.53

19

880

2.20

26

1140

2.85

13

620

2.52

19

890

2.19

26

1150

2.84

13

630

2.51

20

900

2.18

26

1160

2.83

13

640

2.50

20

900

2.17

26

1170

2.82

13

650

2.49

20

910

2.16

27

1180

2.81

14

660

2.48

20

920

2.15

27

1180

2.80

14

660

2.47

20

930

2.14

27

1190

2.79

14

670

2.46

21

940

2.13

27

1200

2.78

14

680

2.45

21

940

2.12

27

1210

2.77

14

690

2.44

21

950

2.11

28

1220

2.76

15

700

2.43

21

960

2.10

28

1220

2.75

15

700

2.42

21

970

2.09

28

1230

2.74

15

710

2.41

22

980

2.08

28

1240

2.73

15

720

2.40

22

980

2.07

28

1250

2.72

15

730

2.39

22

990

2.06

29

1260

2.71

16

740

2.38

22

1000

2.05

29

1260

2.70

16

740

2.37

22

1010

2.04

29

1270

2.69

16

750

2.36

23

1020

2.03

29

1280

2.68

16

760

2.35

23

1020

2.02

29

1290

2.67

16

770

2.34

23

1030

2.01

30

1300

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.00

30

1300

Below 2.0 does not qualify for regular admission.

For admissions purposes, the CSU uses only the SAT scores for mathematics and critical reading.

 

 

 

University Of California

The University of California campuses are located in Berkeley, Davis, Santa Cruz, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Irvine, Riverside and San Diego. The newest campus, U.C. Merced, opened in the fall of 2004. The University of California in San Francisco is primarily a graduate program in the health professions. The University of California selects applicants from the top twelve percent of California’s high school graduates. Admission is based on the student’s grade point average in a specific sequence of high school courses called the “a-g” subjects completed in the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades, and the score on the ACT or the SAT. Beginning in Fall 2012, the SAT II Subject Tests are no longer required for general admission, but may be recommended or required for certain schools or programs.  These must be in two different areas, chosen from the following:  English, history and social studies, mathematics (Level 2 only), science or language other than English. A student is required to complete 15 year-long “a-g” subjects as described below with at least a C grade in each, 11 of which must be completed by the end of the junior year.  Because admission to UC is so competitive, it is recommended that students enroll in more than the minimum requirements. If admission tests are taken more than once, the highest scores from a single sitting are used in admission decisions.  For additional information about UC including their Eligibility Index information, we recommend visiting http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/admissions/.

 

UC Subject Requirements for Admission (as of Fall 2013)

  1. History/Social Science – 2 YEARS REQUIRED

Two years of history/social science, including one year of world history, cultures and geography; and one year of U.S. history or one-half year of U.S. history and one-half year of civics or American government.

 

  1. English – 4 YEARS REQUIRED

Four years of college-preparatory English that include frequent writing, from brainstorming to final paper, as well as reading of classic and modern literature. No more than one year of ESL-type courses can be used to meet this requirement.

 

  1. Mathematics – 3 YEARS REQUIRED, 4 YEARS RECOMMENDED

Three years (four years recommended) of college-preparatory mathematics that include the topics covered in elementary and advanced algebra and two- and three-dimensional geometry. Approved integrated math courses may be used to fulfill part or all of this requirement, as may math courses taken in the seventh and eighth grades if the high school accepts them as equivalent to its own courses. NOTE: Effective for fall 2015 applicants (students applying to UC in November 2014), all students must complete a geometry course.

 

  1. Laboratory Science – 2 YEARS REQUIRED, 3 YEARS RECOMMENDED

Two years (three years recommended) of laboratory science providing fundamental knowledge in two of these three foundational subjects: biology, chemistry and physics. The final two years of an approved three-year integrated science program that provides rigorous coverage of at least two of the three foundational subjects may be used to fulfill this requirement.

 

  1. Language Other than English – 2 YEARS REQUIRED, 3 YEARS RECOMMENDED

Two years (three years recommended) of the same language other than English. Courses should emphasize speaking and understanding, and include instruction in grammar, vocabulary, reading, composition and culture. American Sign Language and classical languages, such as Latin and Greek, are acceptable.

 

  1. Visual and Performing Arts (VPA) – 1 YEAR REQUIRED

One year-long course of visual and performing arts chosen from the following: dance, drama/theater, music or visual art

 

  1. College-Preparatory Electives – 1 YEAR REQUIRED

One year (two semesters), in addition to those required in "a-f" above, chosen from the following areas: visual and performing arts (non-introductory level courses), history, social science, English, advanced mathematics, laboratory science and language other than English (a third year in the language used for the "e" requirement or two years of another language).

College Eligibility for Student Athletes

Students who plan to compete in collegiate athletics must go through a separate eligibility process in addition to the college application process. There are two main bodies for collegiate athletics, the NCAA and the NAIA; these are two separate organizations with different eligibility criteria and processes. Student athletes are highly encouraged to contact the college’s athletics department for information and guidance specific to their sport and program. Students begin the process of applying for athletic eligibility during their junior year.

 

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)

The NCAA currently has separate eligibility criteria for Division I and Division II programs.  Eligibility is based on completion of certain course requirements, grade point average, and the score on the ACT or SAT. Only core courses are used to calculate grade point average. Students must certify their amateurism as part of the eligibility process. For more information about NCAA eligibility, including a list of courses approved for your high school, visit the NCAA eligibility website http://web1.ncaa.org/ECWR2/NCAA_EMS/NCAA_EMS.html# .

 

DIVISION I

 

DIVISION II

16 Core-Course Rule*

 

16 Core-Course Rule

16 Core Courses:

 

16 Core Courses:

4

years of English

 

3

years of English

3

years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)

 

2

years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)

2

years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school)

 

2

years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school)

1

year of additional English, mathematics, or natural/physical science

 

3

years of additional English, mathematics, or natural/physical science

2

years of social science

 

2

years of social science

4

years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or non-doctrinal religion/philosophy)

 

4

years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or non-doctrinal religion/philosophy)

*10 core courses must be completed prior to the beginning of the senior year; 7 of the 10 must be in English, math, or science.

   
 

 

National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA)

Beginning in the Fall 2011, student athletes planning to compete in NAIA athletics must complete the NAIA eligibility process. Eligibility is based on grade point average, high school standing, and the score on the ACT or SAT. Students must be considered amateur athletes. For more information about NAIA eligibility and to register online, visit the NAIA eligibility center http://www.playnaia.org/index.php .

 

An entering freshman must:

  • Be a graduate of an accredited high school;
  • Meet two of the three following requirements:
    • Test score: achieve a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 860 on the SAT (combined score of critical reading and math only)
    • High School GPA: achieve a minimum overall high school GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale
    • Class rank: graduate in the top half of your high school class

 

 

The ACT and the new SAT (formerly SAT I) Reasoning Tests are college entrance tests. Both are accepted by most colleges and universities. Use the comparison chart to determine which test best fits the student’s testing preference.  It is not necessary to take both tests, although students may choose to do so.  Information listed below is for the purpose of giving a general overview.  For the most current information regarding any test dates, fees and registration information please check with your high school’s Career Center or on the websites listed.

 

ACT                                                                              

WEBSITE: http://www.actstudent.org/

The ACT is a multiple choice test designed to measure classroom achievement in four broad content areas, as well as the ability to reason, and the application of problem-solving skills. The test takes approximately three hours and covers English, Mathematics, Reading and Science Reasoning.  The Writing Test, which is optional, measures skill in planning and writing a short essay.  The score is based on the number of correct answers given with no penalty for wrong guesses.  Subscores for English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science Reasoning, as well as a composite score, may be returned to the high school for distribution to the student or sent directly to the student’s home.  This test is accepted by most colleges and universities nationwide.

 

COST:  (2013-2014)     ACT (No Writing)        $36.50 if application is postmarked by the regular deadline

                                                ACT Plus Writing        $52.50 if application is postmarked by the regular deadline

                                                Late Fee                             $23.00 in addition to either of the above options

Standby Fee                    $45.00 - This is in addition to the two fees listed above.

 

New SAT (formerly SAT I)                                                            

WEBSITE:  www.collegeboard.com

The SAT Reasoning Test contains both multiple-choice and essay portions.  It is a test designed to measure academic aptitude in critical reading mathematics and writing.  The Critical Reading section includes reading comprehension, sentence completions, and paragraph-length critical reading items.  Analogies have been eliminated.  The Mathematics section contains numbers and operations, algebra and functions, geometry, statistics, probability, and data analysis items.  Quantitative comparison questions have been eliminated.  The Writing section includes multiple-choice questions on grammar, usage, and word choice.  In addition, students must complete a short written essay.

 

COST:  (2013-2014)     SAT Reasoning Test  $51.00 if application is postmarked by the regular deadline

                                                Late Fee                             $27.50 if application is postmarked by the late deadline

Standby Fee                    $45.00 if no application is mailed and the student walks in on the tests day for the test.  This is in addition to the two fees listed above.  Bring a completed application together with a check or money order made out to the College Board.

 

ACT/SAT Comparison Chart

Test Name

 

ACT

SAT

Test Fee

 

$36.50 (2013-2014)

$51.00 (2013-2014)

Testing Time (overall)

 

Approximately 3 hours

Approximately 3.5 hours

Test Purpose

 

Designed to measure classroom achievement in four broad content areas, as well as the ability to reason and the application of problem- solving skills.

Designed to measure critical reading and reasoning skills, numerical reasoning skills, and writing skills.

Test Content

 

English

Critical Reasoning

 

punctuation

reading comprehension

 

 

grammar

sentence completion

 

sentence structure

critical reading in the humanities,

 

 

Mathematics

Mathematics

 

arithmetic & algebraic operations

arithmetic & algebra

 

 

geometry

other topics (logic, etc.)

 

intermediate algebra

Includes 5 questions requiring students to produce answers

 

 

number & numeration concepts

 

other topics (trig, logic, etc.)

 

 

 

Reading

 

 

social science/sciences

 

 

 

arts/literature

 

 

Science Reasoning

 

 

 

biology

 

 

chemistry

 

 

 

physics

 

 

physical science

 

 

 

Writing (optional, add $16.00)

Writing (required)

 

student written essay

multiple-choice questions on grammar, using, and word choice; student-written essay

Scores Reported

 

English

Writing

 

Mathematics

Mathematics

 

Reading

Critical Reading

 

Science reasoning

 

Scores Released

 

Scores are released to students, the high school and colleges/universities listed by the student

Scores are released to students, the high school and colleges/universities listed by the student

Method of scoring

 

Scores based on number of right answers—no penalty for guessing. Writing scored combined with English, with sub-score also reported.

Lose a fraction of a point for each incorrect answer—penalty for guessing.  Writing scored separately.

 

SAT II: Subject Tests                                                                             

WEBSITE:  www.collegeboard.com

The SAT II consists of one-hour multiple-choice tests in specific subject areas.  Some colleges, including all campuses in the UC system, require these tests for admission.  Unlike the SAT, which measures more general abilities, Subject Tests measure students’ knowledge of a particular subject and their ability to apply that knowledge. Because of this, students should try to take an SAT II subject test as soon as possible after completing the last course in a specific subject.

Tests offered include:

English

Literature

 

History

United States History

World History

 

Mathematics

Mathematics Level 1

Mathematics Level 2

Science

Biology E/M

Chemistry

Physics

 

Languages

Chinese with Listening

French

French with Listening

German

German with Listening

Spanish

Spanish with Listening

Modern Hebrew

Italian

Latin

Japanese with Listening

Korean with Listening

 

Some colleges require a specific combination of SAT II: Subject Tests; some colleges/universities allow students to choose their own. Students are encouraged to check individual college admission requirements before deciding which tests to take.

 

COST:  (2013-2014)

Basic registration fee                              $24.50 if application is postmarked by the regular deadline

                    (per registration)

Language Tests w/Listening                               add $24.00

All other Subject Tests                           add $13.00

Late Fee                                                             $27.50 if application is postmarked by the late deadline

Standby/Waitlist Fee                               $45.00 if no application is mailed and the student walks in on the day for the test.  This is in addition to the two fees listed above.  Bring a completed application together with a check or money order made out to the College Board.

 

PSAT: Preliminary SAT                                                                       

WEBSITE: www.collegeboard.com

The Preliminary SAT is given once a year, in October. This test, usually taken in the Junior year, is used to determine the winners of National Merit Scholarships and is an excellent practice experience for the SAT. When space permits, students are encouraged to take the PSAT as sophomores for practice on these college preparation exams.

COST:  (2013-2014)     $25.00

TOEFL: Test of English as a Foreign Language              

WEBSITE: www.toefl.org

The TOEFL is used to evaluate English proficiency of students whose native language is not English. This test does not replace the ACT or SAT or SAT II.  UC and CSU systems require the TOEFL if 2 years of high school were in a country where the language of instruction was not English.

COST:  (2013-2014)     $180    

Advanced Placement Exams                                                               

WEBSITE: www.collegeboard.com

The Advanced Placement (AP) Program is a program of college-level courses and exams for secondary school students. Over 90 percent of colleges give credit and/or advanced placement to students who score in the upper range of the test (3 or better).  The examination is scored on a five-point scale: 5 (extremely well qualified) to 1 (no recommendation). An AP Grade Report is sent in early July to each student’s home address, school and, if the student requested, to the college.

COST:  (2013-2014)     $95 for regular exams

                                                $105 for special format exams (all World Language exams, Music Theory)

 

How to Read the Course Descriptions

Each course description includes units earned, grade level and recommended precursor courses, if applicable, and a short narrative. In addition, the University of California and California State University “a-g” designations are denoted. Each subject area lists a general description about the connection to that area and both high school graduation and UC eligibility requirements. Eligibility requirements detail the minimum requirements to be eligible for admission into the UC system, not for specific requirements for each campus. For specific admissions criteria of particular colleges and universities, please check directly with the appropriate institution’s admissions office.

Fremont Union High School District Graduation Requirements

A student must earn a minimum 220 units, meeting specific course and subject area requirements, and must pass both sections of the California High School Exit Exam in order to receive a high school diploma:

English

40 units

Social Studies: including World History, US History, US Government, and Economics

30 units

Mathematics: including Algebra and Geometry

20 units

Science: including Life and Physical

20 units

Physical Education

20 units

Electives: additional units taken in any department meet this requirement

70 units

Selective Electives: students must complete 10 units each in two (2) of the following three (3) areas:

     Applied Academics: Career Technical Education/ROP, Business, Computer

                    Programming, Industrial Technology, Living Skills, Work Experience   

     Visual/Performing Arts: Art, Music, Theatre Arts

     World Languages: Chinese, French, Japanese, Spanish

20 units

 

UC/CSU Subject Area Designations

Subject Area

Designation

History and Social Science

a

English

b

Mathematics

c

Laboratory Science

d

Language Other than English

e

Visual and Performing Arts

f

College Preparatory Electives

g

 

The following guide details the wide range of course offerings available throughout the district. Course offerings are determined by a number of factors including: graduation and college admissions requirements; school and district achievement data; student interest; teacher availability/expertise; fiscal resources. In some instances, due to these factors, courses listed in this guide will not be available at all schools. Please refer to your own school’s course selection guide for those courses available to your student. All classes required for graduation and college admission are offered at all schools. All course offerings must be approved in advance by the FUHSD Board of Trustees.

English

Mathematics

Physical Education

Science

Social Science

 

The overall goal of the English-Language Arts program is to enable the student to respond in a variety of ways to the ideas in literature, starting at the personal and progressing to the universal level. This goal is achieved in the classroom by: using literature that focuses on aesthetic, ethical, cultural and political issues and themes; using active learning strategies that help students integrate thinking, reading, speaking, listening and writing; using a variety of assessment strategies.

Writing instruction focuses on the process of writing and on self-discovery: connecting personal experience to the ideas and issues of literature. Speaking and listening activities are integrated into all language classes.

Students are expected to develop their abilities to read more broadly and to comprehend at higher levels, as well as to work effectively in groups. Throughout the curriculum, students are encouraged to thin both creatively and critically; to express independent thinking; and to work on clarity of thought in written and oral communication.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

There is a four-year requirement for graduation.

UC ELIGIBILITY

“b” English –4 years required. A student must earn 40 units and grades of “C” or higher in approved English courses.

1010: Literature & Writing                                

Grades: 9

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: none. This course integrates the study of literature with instruction in the writing process. Students will explore the ideas and issues of literature while improving their writing, speaking, listening, thinking and language skills. Materials include poetry and prose, fiction and non-fiction.

 

1020: World Literature & Writing

Grades: 10

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: none. Using works of world literature, the student will explore themes of human experience and inquiry. The literature will include novels, plays, stories and poetry by historical and contemporary authors from around the world. This literature-based program provides instruction and experiences for students to build their listening, speaking, reading, writing and thinking skills.

 

1030: Expository Reading & Writing

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: None.  The goal of this course is to prepare college-bound seniors for the literacy demands of higher education. Through a sequence of fourteen rigorous instructional modules, students in this yearlong, rhetoric-based course develop advanced proficiencies in expository, analytical, and argumentative reading and writing. The cornerstone of the course, the assignment template, presents a process for helping students read, comprehend, and respond to non-fiction and literary texts. Modules also provide instruction in research methods and documentation conventions. Students will be expected to increase their awareness of the rhetorical strategies employed by authors, and to apply those strategies in their own writing. They will read closely to examine the relationship between an author’s argument or theme and his or her audience and purpose, to analyze the impact of structural and rhetorical strategies, and to examine the social, political, and philosophical assumptions that underlie the text. By the end of the course, students will be expected to use this process independently when reading unfamiliar texts and writing in response to them. Course texts include contemporary essays, newspaper and magazine articles, editorials, reports, biographies, memos, assorted public documents, and other non-fiction texts. The course materials also include modules on two full-length works (one novel and one work of non-fiction). Written assessments and holistic scoring guides conclude each unit.

1043: Global Literature & Writing

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Required: Intermediate-level English learners enroll in this class concurrently with ELD 2. Students will read literature from different cultures of the world. While the reading is primarily in English, students will be encouraged to share examples of literature from their own native culture. In addition, students will be introduced to the basic elements of literature, including character, setting, plot and theme analysis. The emphasis is on instructing reading and writing strategies to prepare students for Literature/Writing 1 and higher English classes.

 

1060: Academic Reading & Writing

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Placement in this course is based on teacher recommendation and/or scores from middle school assessments (including CSTs and additional/other reading assessments). This reading intervention course is for students who need targeted support and acceleration of their academic reading and writing skills. Course activities are designed to expand vocabulary, improve reading comprehension, and target listening, speaking, and writing skills using adaptive technology and whole- and small-group instruction.

 

1130: American Literature & Writing

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: none. This course provides rigorous and challenging experiences for the student in the areas of critical reading, critical thinking, effective discussion, essay test-taking, expository writing and research. The core of the curriculum is a chronological or thematic study of American literature, its literary periods and major writings. Outside reading focuses on broader philosophical ideas, encouraging wider reading including classics by American authors.

 

1140: American Literature & Writing Honors

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: none. This course is designed for students who enjoy being challenged in literature and writing classes and who are prepared to accept the responsibilities of that challenge. Like the American Literature course this honors course is a chronological or thematic study of American literature, its literary periods and its major writers; however, the honors course will include more extensive reading, writing (both timed and process essays) and analytical thinking. Furthermore, students in the honors program are expected to invest significantly more academic energy into the course and to work more independently than students taking American Literature and Writing.

 

1180: Voices of Modern Culture

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: None.  This course makes use of a variety of literary and language forms to explore the major ideas in modern culture including poetry, the short story, the novel, drama, film, nonfiction writing and reporting, and investigative research. The main focus of the course is understanding all texts as unique “voices” from other cultures in other places and times. The course is divided into six units: Many Selves, Many Voices, encountering the Other and Being the other, a Medley of Voices, Voices from the Past, Visible Voices, and Multiple Perspectives. Within each of these six units is an emphasis on writing instruction, literary study and oral skills.

 

1190: AP English Language & Composition

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: None.  The AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. The course also shows how generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing This course uses a survey of American literature and writing from the beginning of the country to modern times with which to frame the studies of language and composition.

 

1230: Humanities

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: None.  Students learn the relationship between literature, music, fine arts, history, and philosophy.  The course increases awareness and understanding of various levels of meaning in different branches of the humanities. Students routinely read, write, present projects, and debate information.

 

1240: British Literature & Writing

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: none. This course includes the study of the literature of the Anglo-Saxon period, the Medieval and Elizabethan periods, and the Jacobean and Puritan ages, a sweep that entails Britain’s dramatic literature and history from 449 to 1660. Also covered is literature written from 1660 to today, including the Restoration and Eighteenth Century, the Romantic Age, the Victorian Age and the Twentieth Century.

 

1290: Contemporary Literature & Writing

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: none. This course enables students to read and analyze literature relevant to ideas and problems of people today. Themes central to the human situation are discussed and debated, and students write expository essays. This course also delves into contemporary thought and applies those values to the literature through formal papers, discussions and projects.

 

1300: Mythology/Folklore & Writing

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended:  None.  This course is an introduction to mythology and folklore of a country or group of people.  Students analyze the relationship between myths and various cultures in order to highlight universal themes in mythology, discuss the significance of literary devices from classical and contemporary literature, and build vocabulary from words in the literature.  Extensive expository and analytical activities, writing and speaking experiences are integrated.

 

1250: European Literature & Writing

Grades:12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

European Literature 12 is a college-preparatory course for high school seniors. Beginning with the Middle Ages, the course is organized chronologically, encompassing a wide variety of masterworks from the literary traditions of the British Isles and continental Europe. In addition to offering a rough historical survey of European literature, the course functions as a genre review that embraces epic poetry, drama, novels, lyric poetry, short stories, essays, historical accounts, philosophical works, and other informational texts. The course writing assignments will prepare students for the types of writing they are likely to encounter in college. These assignments include persuasive essays, timed responses to fictional and non-fictional readings, literary analysis essays, and formal research papers. Students will also have the opportunity to write their own poems and fictional pieces, in response to the literary examples on the course reading list.

1260: Story and Style: A Critical Lens

Grades: 12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: None.   This course presents students with new ways to view multiple literary genres including, but not limited to, drama, speech, multimedia text, expository text, and the novel. Students will be expected to analyze and evaluate their world through the lenses of the texts they read and write about during this course. They will become more critical consumers of the written and spoken word through an ongoing examination of how an author manipulates a text's structure and syntax to illustrate a point. Themes of personal reflection and the human condition will be explored through expository and literary essays, creative non-fiction, persuasive speeches, and class discussions. Students will complete a senior thesis, which involves extensive, in-depth research on an individual topic and interaction with members of the community.

 

1410: AP English Literature & Composition

Grades: 12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: None.  This Advanced Placement English course in Literature and Composition engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of literature.  Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers.  As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as smaller-scale elements, such as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone.  The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on selections that do not yield all of their pleasures of thought and feeling the first time through.  Students will read deliberately and thoroughly, taking time to understand a work’s complexity in order to absorb its richness of meaning and to analyze how that meaning is embodied in literary form.

 

The Interdisciplinary Program

1160: American Studies

Grades: 11

Units: 10 English, 10 US History

UC/CSU Requirement: a & b

Recommended: None. This combined US History/American Literature and Writing course is a team-taught, two-period, yearlong study of the events, ideas and cultural movements that have shaped Americans and the United States in the twentieth century. The key question students address and the course explores in depth is, What does it mean to be an American in the twenty-first century? Students read a wide variety of literature, including traditional forms (fiction, nonfiction, drama and poetry) as well as historical documents and critical essays. The two instructors, one English and the other Social Studies, will guide students through a variety of learning activities with an emphasis on team learning through collaboration and cooperation.

 

1170: World Studies/World Core

Grades: 10

Units: 10 English, 10 World Hist

UC/CSU Requirement: a & b

Recommended: None.  World Studies is an integrated class, designed for sophomore students, which incorporates World History and a foundation level English course into a two-period block class. World History from the French Revolution to the present day is the context in which the class operates. It uses appropriate literature from the major continents and civilizations of the world to integrate into the study of world history. A major emphasis is placed on writing, including essays, term papers, and short theses. A determined effort is made to insure that diverse cultural perspectives are incorporated in all units of study.

 

English Language Development Program*   

1420: ELD Level 1A

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Assessment. ELD 1A focuses on speaking and listening skills for beginning level English Language Learners. This course helps students develop basic interpersonal communication skills. Through quality interactive instruction and activities, the course introduces both communicative and academic vocabulary, covers language patterns, grammatical structure, and oral skills to help the student survive academically in American schools and functionally in society.  ELD 1A course is taken concurrently with ELD 1B.

 

1430: ELD Level 1B

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Assessment. ELD 1B emphasizes reading, writing, and literacy skills for the beginning level English Language Learners. Students begin by learning how to compose paragraphs and progress to authoring organized expository and narrative writings, including descriptive, compare and contrast, narratives, and literary response essays. ELD 1B is designed to be a print rich environment including both non-fictional and fictional texts.  ELD 1B course is taken concurrently with ELD 1A.

 

1430: ELD Level 1C

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Assessment. Using science and social studies texts, beginning English Language Learners (ELL) will develop knowledge of introductory science and social studies concepts in preparation for subsequent courses in these disciplines. The focus, however, will be on acquiring cross-disciplinary high frequency vocabulary (CALP or Tier 2 words) applicable to all academic areas. In addition, students will learn reading strategies (e.g., how to reconstruct expository information using graphic organizers) and study skills (e.g., how to take notes). Addressing 9-12 Social Studies, Science and ELD standards, this course functions as reinforcement and enrichment of the ELD1A/B curriculum.

 

1440: ELD Level 2

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Assessment. This course is designed for students who already have a foundational knowledge of English in academic and communicative vocabulary, sentence structure, reading of non-fictional and fictional texts, and writing. Through quality interactive instruction and activities, students will continue to build cognitive academic language proficiency in all four skill areas. Texts will be of greater length and complexity. Students will be introduced to additional expository and narrative writing genres, including persuasive, research and biographical essays.

 

1450: ELD Level 3

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: b

Recommended: Assessment. This course is designed for advanced learners of English as an additional language. Students acquire sophisticated academic and communicative vocabulary, sentence structure, reading of non-fictional and fictional texts, and writing. Students read non-fictional and fictional texts of demanding length and complexity in various genres to prepare them for advanced mainstream English and courses in other content areas. Through quality interactive instruction and activities, a print-rich environment, and public speaking experiences, students will continue to solidify cognitive academic language proficiency in all four skill areas. Students will be introduced to additional expository and narrative writing genres, including full research reports and reflective essays.

 

* Students in the ELD program will concurrently be placed in a sheltered literature course appropriate to their English level. ELD students are assessed yearly for appropriate placement.

English Elective Courses

The following courses can be found in the Applied Academics section beginning on page 41 of this guide:

1350: Writing for Publication

1360: Journalism

1370: Oral Composition

 

Mathematics

Gaining mathematical power is the focus of this instructional program. Mathematically powerful students can think and communicate by drawing on mathematical ideas and by using math tools and techniques. They can solve problems and use data systematically to develop patterns and explanations. Mathematically powerful students can think and communicate by drawing on mathematical ideas and by using math tools and techniques and they can solve problems and use data systematically to develop patterns and explanations. Mathematically powerful students do something meaningful and purposeful with their mathematics, including furthering their studies in science, technology, and social science and applying their math power to daily living and workplace options. All students need to engage in challenging mathematics in order to be prepared for the technical jobs of the new workplace.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

There is a two-year requirement for graduation; the minimum is Algebra 1 and Geometry.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“c” Mathematics – 3 year required, 4 years recommended. A student must earn 30 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in approved mathematic courses.

2210: Algebra 1

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended:  There is no prerequisite to take this course.  Algebra 1 is imperative for success in subsequent math courses, and transitions students from arithmetic to symbolic reasoning.  The key content, which follows the state standards for Algebra 1, involves understanding, writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations and inequalities.  When graphing linear equations, emphasis will be placed on understanding the slope-intercept formula and slope in general as it relates to parallel and perpendicular lines.  Solving systems of two linear equations in two unknowns is also emphasized.  Quadratic equations will be solved by factoring, using graphs, and applying the quadratic formula.  Students should also become comfortable with operations on monomial and polynomial expressions.  They learn to solve problems employing all of these techniques.  Algebra 1 meets the graduation requirement.  This is a one period course that covers all the district standards.

 

2210: Algebra 1 with Algebra Workshop

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10 Math, 10 Elective

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended: Teacher recommendation is required for this course. Algebra 1 is imperative for success in subsequent math courses, and transitions students from arithmetic to symbolic reasoning.  The key content, which follows the state standards for Algebra 1, involves understanding, writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations and inequalities.  When graphing linear equations, emphasis will be placed on understanding the slope-intercept formula and slope in general as it relates to parallel and perpendicular lines.  Solving systems of two linear equations in two unknowns is also emphasized.  Quadratic equations will be solved by factoring, using graphs, and applying the quadratic formula.  Students should also become comfortable with operations on monomial and polynomial expressions.  They learn to solve problems employing all of these techniques.  Algebra 1 with Algebra Workshop meets the graduation requirement.  This course covers all the state standards and provides extra support to strengthen math foundations in addition to algebra skills and concepts.  Students enrolled in this program have math for two periods, and earn 10 math units and 10 elective units.

 

2230: Geometry

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended: C or better in Algebra 1, Algebra 1B or Algebra I with Algebra Workshop or completion of Algebra 1B.  The key content, which follows the state standards for Geometry, includes a formal development of geometric skills and concepts.  This course introduces plane and solid geometry.  They will develop the ability to construct formal logical arguments and proofs in a geometric setting.   Students will build their reasoning skills through studying the following topics:  properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, compass constructions, transformations, volume, area, similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, coordinate geometry, and an introduction to basic trigonometric functions.  Geometry meets the graduation requirement.    This course covers all state standards and prepares a student for Algebra 2.

 

2240: Geometry Enriched

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended: B or better in Algebra I or Algebra 1B with teacher recommendation.  The key content, which follows the state standards for Geometry, includes a formal development of geometric skills and concepts.  This course introduces plane and solid geometry.  They will develop the ability to construct formal logical arguments and proofs in a geometric setting.   Students will build their reasoning skills through studying the following topics:  properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, compass constructions, transformations, volume, area, similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, coordinate geometry, and an introduction to basic trigonometric functions.  Geometry Enriched meets the graduation requirement.  Emphasis will be placed on formal proofs and students are expected to have a firm grasp of Algebra 1 concepts.  This course covers the state standards and prepares students for the rigor of the accelerated course that follows:  Algebra 2/Trigonometry.

 

2310: Algebra 2

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended: C or better in Geometry with teacher recommendation.  This course expands and reviews the mathematical content of Algebra 1 and Geometry.  Emphasis is placed on abstract thinking skills, the function concept including domain and range, extension from the real to the complex number system, and the algebraic solution of problems in various content areas. Polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, rational, and conic functions and relations comprise the core material through which equations and graphs are studied and applied.  Additional topics include combinatorics, probability, basic statistics, sequences, and series.  Calculators are used to aid in the solution of problems and in making estimates for realistic solutions.

 

2320: Algebra 2/Trigonometry

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended: Recommended: B or better in Geometry (Enriched) with teacher recommendation. Algebra 2/Trig is for accelerated students who plan to maximize the amount of mathematics studied in high school. Course content includes a more rigorous study of all topics taught in the Algebra 2 course. Students will study, in depth, the 6 trigonometric functions as they relate to the unit circle using radians and degrees to simplify expressions, solve equations and applications, and graph basic and translated trigonometric functions.  Additional topics include solving triangles, defining and solving equations with inverse trigonometric functions, and proving and applying trigonometric identities.

 

2400: Math Analysis

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended: B or better in Algebra 2 with teacher recommendation.  This course is recommended for those students planning to take Calculus. Topics covered include trigonometric functions of ratios of lengths of sides of triangles, circular functions, graphical characteristics of trigonometric functions, solution of right triangles, radian and degree measure, trigonometric identities, laws of sines and cosines, solution of oblique triangles, reinforcement of function concept, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, polar coordinates and vectors and their graphs, trigonometric form of complex numbers, de Moivre's Theorem, coordinate geometry, conic sections, rational functions and their graphs, elementary functions and their inverses, introduction to linear algebra, parametric equations and their graphs, lines and planes in space, three-dimensional coordinate geometry and vectors in space.

 

2420: Pre-Calculus Honors

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended: B or better in Algebra 2/Trigonometry or Math Analysis.  This course is recommended for those students planning to take Calculus.  The curriculum includes an in-depth algebraic and graphical analysis of different families of functions and their inverses, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions.  Rectangular, polar, and parametric forms of an equation will be taught in addition to vectors and their graphs.  Further study of topics introduced in earlier courses includes matrices and determinants, coordinate geometry, conic sections, series and sequences, binomial expansion, properties of radical expressions, complex numbers, de Moivre’s Theorem, limits (epsilon-delta), and an introduction to calculus.

 

2430: AP Calculus AB       

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended: C or better in Pre-Calculus Honors, or B or better in Math Analysis with teacher recommendation.  This course covers the content of two quarters (more than one semester) of a college Calculus curriculum, focusing on the application of limits, differentiation and integration. Some techniques of integration and indeterminate forms for limits are also covered. Throughout the course, an emphasis is placed on symbolic, graphical, and numeric representations, as well as on clear communication of mathematical thinking. Students successfully completing this course are prepared to take the Calculus AB AP Exam which requires use of a graphing calculator .

 

2440: AP Calculus BC

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended:  B or better in Pre-Calculus Honors with teacher recommendation.  This course covers the content of three quarters (two semesters) of a college Calculus curriculum, focusing on applications of limits, differentiation and integration.  Numerical approaches (such as Newton’s method, Simpson’s Rule, and Euler’s Method); various techniques of integration; indeterminate forms for limits; and Taylor series are also covered, as well as application of Calculus techniques to parametric and polar representations. Throughout the course, an emphasis is placed on symbolic, graphical and numeric representations, as well as on clear communication of mathematical thinking.  Students successfully completing this course are prepared to take the Calculus BC AP Exam which requires use of a graphing calculator.

 

2460: AP Statistics

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: c

Recommended:  C or better in Algebra 2 or higher math course with teacher recommendation.  This course covers the content of one semester of an introductory, non-Calculus-based, college curriculum in Statistics which is often a requirement for college students majoring in the social sciences, health sciences and business. Students will be introduced to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  The course is built around four main topics:  exploring data, planning a study, probability as it relates to distribution of data, and inferential reasoning.  With the possible exception of probability, most of the material in this course has not been a part of the traditional secondary mathematics curriculum. Students successfully completing this course are prepared to take the Statistics AP Exam which includes use of a graphing calculator.

 

The Interdisciplinary Program

2436: AP Calculus/AP Physics

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10 Math, 10 Science

UC/CSU Requirement: c & d

Recommended: Pre-Calculus Honors and 2 years of a lab science.  This two-period year-long course integrates curriculum from AP Calculus BC and AP Physics C: Mechanics, and prepares students to take both the AP Calculus BC examination and the AP Physics C: Mechanics examination. The course provides a foundation in college-level physics, including mechanics, electricity, and magnetism, as well as college-level calculus, including fundamental theorems of differential and integral calculus. Methods of calculus are used in formulating physical principles and in applying them to physical problems. The course is especially appropriate for students planning to major in the physical sciences or engineering.

Math Elective Courses

The following courses can be found in the Applied Academics section beginning on page 45 of this guide:

2350: AP Computer Science A

2370: Computer Programming JAVA

 

Our goal is to prepare our students for life in our society. Our objectives are to give the students information and basic skills they will need for survival and longevity. We expect our students to go away with an understanding of and a positive attitude towards physical fitness and wellness. Our two years of required Physical Education (PE) are divided into two programs—PE 9 core and PE 10 electives. The unit activities are instruction oriented and of two types—survival and carry-over life time activities. The survival activities are designed to give our students the knowledge and skills needed to have a healthy life. In the carry-over activities, we are attempting to expose our students to a variety of experiences, some of which they might pursue for a lifetime.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

There is a two-year requirement for graduation. 

UC ELIGIBILITY

There is not a Physical Education requirement.

2510: PE 9

Grades: 9

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: None. A basic course required of all freshmen, which includes instruction in beginning and intermediate skills, basic rules, history and etiquette in a variety of sports. To complete the program, a student must complete the objectives of an activity in each of the following areas: Individual—an activity in which the student performs without the need of another person; Dual—an activity in which a student competes against another student; Team—an activity in which a group of students compete against another group of students; Rhythmic—an activity in which movement is coordinated with music or a rhythmic beat; Aquatic—an activity which covers the basic skills of swimming; Wellness—fundamentals of good health practices are incorporated in activities.

 

2530: PE 10-12

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: PE 9. The PE 10 elective program is designed to allow choice in the selection of physical education activities. Emphasis is placed on refining basic skill and participation. The activities typically offered may include: aerobics, aquatics, basketball, badminton, body development, dance, flag football, game management, golf, gymnastics, pickleball, recreational games, soccer, softball, tennis, track, ultimate Frisbee, volleyball, weight training, wrestling.

 

2560: PE Soccer

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: PE 9. This course is designed for those students interested in developing skills in soccer.  Emphasis is placed on refining skills and team playing.

 

2620: PE Elective

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: PE 9. The elective program is designed to allow individual choice in the selection of physical education activities. Emphasis is on the continued development of basic skills and carry-over activities.

 

2670: PE Basketball

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: PE 9. This course will enable students to gain knowledge of basic team basketball skills; dribble, pass, pivot screen, shoot for goal, goal keeping, understanding rules, understanding individual positions on the court.

2710: PE Bowling

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: PE 9. This course includes instruction in skills, rules and etiquette involved in bowling. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development in a team setting.

 

2720: PE Racquet Sports

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: PE 9. This course is designed for students interested in developing skills in the various racquet sports and physical conditioning: tennis, pickle ball and badminton. Emphasis is placed on refining skills, strategy and competitive doubles and singles play.

 

2740: PE Weight Training

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: PE 9. This course is designed for those students interested in developing body strength for advanced sports skills. Students will engage in weightlifting, cardiovascular conditioning and flexibility exercises. Students will utilize both free weights and weight machines.

 

2780: PE Total Fitness

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: PE 9. The course emphasizes aerobic activity with elements of all five of the components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition.   This course is set to prepare students for a life of fitness after high school.  Knowledge of anatomy and physiology will be introduced. Individual students will be assessed primarily on their own personal fitness level and student personal PE folders will be maintained.

Specialized Physical Education Courses

2525: PE 9 Band

Grades: 9

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Approval of Music and PE Department heads. This is a basic twelve-week course, offered first semester only, for students who participate in the school marching band.

 

After marching season, 9th grade students join a regular PE class.

 

2545: PE 10 Band

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Approval of Music and PE Department heads. This is a basic twelve-week course, offered first semester only, for students who participate in the school marching band.

 

After marching season, 10th grade students join a regular PE class.

 

2590: PE Athletics

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Required: Student must be a member of an interscholastic athletic squad. This is an elective course, limited to students who are members of interscholastic athletic squads, spirit, drill, and auxiliary teams.  10th grade students may earn their PE credit through a team rather than a regular PE class upon completion of the season. Credit will only be given within the 35 per semester or 70 per year credit limits.

9th grade students may earn 5 elective credits per Sport Season within the 35-credit limit (70 credits per year).

 

2590: PE Athletics (participation form required)

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Required: Student must be a member of an interscholastic athletic squad and MUST complete the PE Sport Competitive Sports Participation Agreement. This is an elective course, limited to students who are members of interscholastic athletic squads, spirit, drill and auxiliary teams.  10th grade students who wish to earn their PE credit through a team rather than a regular PE class MUST complete PE Sport Competitive Sports Participation Agreement. Credit will only be given within the 35 per semester or 70 per year credit limits.

9th grade students may earn 5 elective credits per Sport Season within the 35-credit limit (70 credits per year).

 

2640: PE Dance

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: PE 9. This course is designed to enable the student to expand their knowledge of the application of dance as a physical fitness option.

 

2810: Dance 1

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: PE 9. Dance 1 is based in jazz techniques is and is open to all students.  Students will also study ballet, modern, musical theater, and dances of different cultures.  The specific goals of this course include: increased muscle control and body awareness, body alignment and placement, musical rhythms, dance techniques and terminology, dance sequences, ensemble dance, and choreography.  Students will be required to maintain a written portfolio that will contain vocabulary handouts, musical critiques, and self-evaluations.  Students are expected to perform in two dance concerts.

 

A good science background is essential in our technology-oriented society and workplace.  The content of our science classes includes the essential skills and knowledge students will need to be scientifically literate citizens in the twenty-first century.  Students have the opportunity to learn science by receiving direct instruction, by reading textbooks and supplemental materials, by solving standards-based problems, and by doing laboratory investigations and experiments.  Students are encouraged to take a science class each year, not only to enhance future college admissions, but also to gain a better understanding of the world around them.  AP (Advanced Placement) courses are based on standards established by College Board through the Advanced Placement Program.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

There is a two-year requirement for graduation.  One year must be a physical science and the other a life science; Environmental Science may be used to satisfy either year.

UC ELIGIBILITY

“d” Laboratory Science – 2 years required, 3 years recommended. A student must earn 20 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in approved laboratory science courses.

3110: Biology

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: None.  Biology is a recommended Prerequisite course for all other science courses.  It is a standards-based laboratory course that develops an understanding and appreciation of the nature of scientific inquiry applied to the study of living things.  This course is based on California State Content Standards that include Cell Biology, Genetics, Ecology, Evolution, Physiology, and Investigation and Experimentation. These standards are interrelated to develop a comprehensive understanding of the living world.

 

3120: AP Biology

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: AP Biology students must have an understanding of the basics of both Biology and Chemistry to be successful.  Students enrolling in this course should have a strong knowledge of both biology and chemistry. The course stresses the biochemistry of the processes of living organisms and the unity underlying these processes. The relationship of organisms with their environment, the evolution of structures and functions, ecological succession and the patterns of growth are all covered in depth.

 

3130: Physiology

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: Biology and Chemistry. This is a laboratory course investigating the functional phenomena of human life and the principal conclusions that have been reached about the causes and interdependence of these phenomena. Studies also include structure and functional mechanisms for the performance and coordination of external and internal activities of the human body.

 

3610: Chemistry

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: Biology and Algebra 1. Chemistry is a standards-based laboratory course that offers a solid foundation in chemistry. The course guides students through the structures and properties of atoms and compounds, the periodic table, chemical equations, properties of solutions, gases, and acids and bases, principles of equilibrium, and select topics such as nuclear chemistry and biochemistry. Emphasis is placed on the use of algebra to perform quantitative calculations. This laboratory-oriented course is also designed to help students use their knowledge to make informed decisions about chemical issues in their society and the world.

 

3620: Chemistry Honors

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: Biology and Geometry. This course offers a solid foundation in chemistry covering all of the required California State Standards for chemistry as well as most of the optional standards. Emphasis is placed on the experimental nature of chemistry. Students are expected to have a solid background in mathematics. The course deals with scientific measurement, chemical equations and quantitative calculations, the atomic theory, the periodic table, gases, solutions, solubility, ions, reaction rates, equilibrium, acids and bases, energy effects in chemical reactions, organic and nuclear chemistry.

 

3630: AP Chemistry

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended:  Algebra 2 and Chemistry. The course is strongly aligned with the typical freshman college chemistry course for science majors. It places particular emphasis on atomic structure and periodicity, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, reaction kinetics, acid/base and solubility equilibrium, states of matter, gas laws relating to both ideal and real gasses, nuclear chemistry, thermodynamics, introductory organic chemistry and electrochemistry. Students taking this course should have a strong interest in the subject and a solid background in mathematics and basic chemistry.

 

3710: Physics

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: Biology and Algebra 1. Physics is a qualitative study of the central concepts of physics (time, space, energy and matter) with emphasis on the mental imagery, rather than the mathematics, involved in describing events. The purpose is to provide a college preparatory course that meets the standards for those who are interested in discovering the strategies of science through laboratory experiences. Physics explores the concepts of mechanics and the properties of matter, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism.

 

3720: Physics Honors

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: Biology and Algebra 2. Much of the time in this course is spent doing physics experiments and in solving physics story problems. The principle content is basic mechanics that includes the properties of matter, motion, forces, and energy. Other topics studied are geometric optics, light and other wave phenomena, properties of waves, electricity and magnetism, force field, quantum mechanics and the physics of atomic structure. With its emphasis on mathematical models, this course is recommended for the student who is planning a career in architecture, engineering, physical sciences, or mathematics.

 

3730: AP Physics C: Mechanics

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: Pre-Calculus Honors and Physics Honors. This course is strongly aligned with the typical freshman college physics Mechanics course for science majors. Much of the time is spent solving problems and doing experiments involving motion, forces and energy.

 

3740: AP Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: Pre-Calculus Honors and Physics Honors. This course is strongly aligned with the typical freshman college physics course for science majors. Much of the time is spent solving problems and doing experiments in optics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism and modern physics. Students taking this course should have a strong interest in the subject and a solid mathematical background.

 

3810: Environmental Science

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended:  Biology. This is a standards-based course that centers of the following four areas of study:  the hydrosphere, biosphere, lithosphere (geosphere), and atmosphere, with a focus on how the choices made by individuals and groups have an impact on each.  In addition to lectures and projects there will be experiments in the classroom and application of scientific principles through fieldwork.  Students can earn physical or life science credit toward high school graduation for this course.

 

3840: AP Environmental Science

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Recommended: Biology, Chemistry and Algebra 1. This class is equivalent to a college level environmental science class. As such, it is a fast paced and demanding study of how humans interact with and depend on their environment.  It is an interdisciplinary, “big-picture” science that applies elements of all the other traditional sciences (Biology, Chemistry, and Physics). Contemporary environmental issues such as climate change, pollution, population issues, food and land resources, energy consumption, and species loss will be explored in great depth.  This class is well suited for students that have a strong interest and commitment to better understanding their environment and enjoy connecting science to social and political issues.

The Interdisciplinary Program

3726: AP Calculus/AP Physics

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10 Math, 10 Science

UC/CSU Requirement: c & d

Recommended: Pre-Calculus Honors and 2 years of a lab science.  This two-period year-long course integrates curriculum from AP Calculus BC and AP Physics C: Mechanics, and prepares students to take both the AP Calculus BC examination and the AP Physics C: Mechanics examination. The course provides a foundation in college-level physics, including mechanics, electricity, and magnetism, as well as college-level calculus, including fundamental theorems of differential and integral calculus. Methods of calculus are used in formulating physical principles and in applying them to physical problems. The course is especially appropriate for students planning to major in the physical sciences or engineering.

Career Technical Education (CTE) Courses

The following course can be found in the Applied Academics  section beginning on page 47 of this guide:

7655: Biotechnology

 

Social Studies/History

In the history/social sciences, students learn how their lives have been and will continue to be affected by domestic and international politics, demographics, economic flux, technological change, and social change. The study of continuity and change in human events is the main focus of the history/social science curriculum. Students will understand and appreciate how ideas, events, and individuals have intersected to produce change over time as well as to recognize the conditions and forces that maintain continuity within human societies.

 

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

There is a three-year requirement for graduation that includes World History, United States History, and Economics/Government.

 

UC ELIGIBILITY

“a” History/Social Science – 2 years required. A student must earn 20 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in approved history/social science courses.  While Economics is needed for meeting high school graduation requirement for Social Studies, for UC Eligibility, it is included in the “g” requirement.

 

1620: World History

Grades: 10

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: a

Recommended: None.  In this course, students examine major turning points in the shaping of the modern world and the rise of Democratic ideas from the late eighteenth century to the present. The year begins with an introduction to current world issues and then continues with a focus on the expansion of the West and the growing interdependence of people and cultures throughout the world including Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

 

1730: US History

Grades: 11

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: a

Recommended: None.  In this course, students study the History of the United States in the twentieth century. The year begins with a review of U.S. History prior to the 20th Century. After the review unit, this course will study:  America at the turn of the Century, United States as a world power, the 1920’s, the Great Depression and New Deal, United States in World War II and the post-war period, U.S. foreign policy since World War II, the Civil Rights movement, and the Unites States in contemporary society.

 

1750: AP US History

Grades: 11

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: a

Recommended: Students should have earned a “B” or better in their previous history class and have strong writing skills. This survey course gives students a thorough grounding in facts, and goes on to examine the significance of facts, their contexts, as well as their causes and results. This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and material in United States history.  Students learn how to read historical material analytically and critically, to weigh historical evidence and interpretations and to arrive at conclusions on the basis of facts. Students should expect a steady and heavy load of reading from the text book, in addition to Document Based and Free Response essays that put particular demands on historical knowledge and the ability to make and prove a historical argument.  Unlike the mainstream US History course, where there is single focus on the US in the 20th Century, AP US History covers the entire scope of our history, from the Amerindian settlements to contemporary American issues.  The course makes demands similar to those found in introductory college courses and prepares students for success on the AP US History test held in early May.

 

1835: Economics

Grades: 12

Units: 5

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: None.  The course covers economic principles such as production, supply and demand, profits, distribution of goods, competition, money and banking, government monetary and fiscal policies, credit insurance, securities market and comparative economic systems.

 

1845: US Government

Grades: 12

Units: 5

UC/CSU Requirement: a

Recommended: None.  The goals of this course are to give an understanding of democratic processes and an awareness of the values and social framework that support them. Major units in the course are federal government, state government, political parties and elections and selected issues of government in the United States.

 

1855: AP US Government & Politics

Grades: 12

Units: 5

UC/CSU Requirement: a

Recommended: Students should have earned a “B” or better in their previous history class and have strong writing skills. The advanced placement course in government parallels an introductory college course in political science. The course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of and critical perspective on the system of US government politics, policy, and practices.  Instruction emphasizes understanding course content by way of in-depth research and analysis.  Furthermore, students will apply their understanding of the subject matter to both historical and current political events and analyze their impact on American society.  AP US Government and Politics is a tightly structured, highly demanding, fast-paced college-level course in which students study a year’s amount of curriculum in only one semester.  Students will be required to read the college-level textbook and supplemental readings.  Expository writing will be required. Ideally, this course is really for those students who are specifically interested in government and politics.

 

1865: AP Microeconomics

Grades: 12

Units: 5

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: Students should have earned a “B” or better in their previous history class and have strong writing skills. The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Economics is to give students a thorough and advanced understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger mixed market economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of decision making by households and firms.

 

1875: AP Macroeconomics

Grades: 12

Units: 5

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: Students should have earned a “B” or better in their previous history class and have strong writing skills. The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Economics is to give students a thorough and advanced understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger mixed market economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of decision making by households and firms.

 

The Interdisciplinary Program

1760: American Studies

Grades: 11

Units: 10 English, 10 US History

UC/CSU Requirement: a & b

Recommended: None. This combined US History/American Literature and Writing course is a team-taught, two-period, yearlong study of the events, ideas and cultural movements that have shaped Americans and the United States in the twentieth century. The key question students address and the course explores in depth is, What does it mean to be an American in the twenty-first century? Students read a wide variety of literature, including traditional forms (fiction, nonfiction, drama and poetry) as well as historical documents and critical essays. The two instructors, one English and the other Social Studies, will guide students through a variety of learning activities with an emphasis on team learning through collaboration and cooperation.

 

1770: World Studies/World Core SS

Grades: 10

Units: 10 English, 10 World Hist

UC/CSU Requirement: a & b

Recommended: None.  World Studies is an integrated class, designed for sophomore students, which incorporates World History and a foundation level English course into a two-period block class. World History from the French Revolution to the present day is the context in which the class operates. It uses appropriate literature from the major continents and civilizations of the world to integrate into the study of world history. A major emphasis is placed on writing, including essays, term papers, and short theses. A determined effort is made to insure that diverse cultural perspectives are incorporated in all units of study.

 

 

Business

English Electives

Industrial Technology

Living Skills

Math Electives

Career Technical Education/ROP

 

These courses all satisfy the FUHSD Applied Academics credit category.

Business Education is a comprehensive Applied Academic Program that includes offerings in computer technology, marketing education, international business and specialized courses for personal use and college preparation. The Business Education Program emphasizes computer-based instructional strategies and supports and applies the academic areas of economics, language arts and mathematics.

The nature of the workplace is in a constant state of change and evolution, and the courses taught in the Business Education Program are designed to bring the world of school and work closer together by imparting broad conceptual and social skills, as well as practical and specific skills.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Business courses are electives in the Applied Academics credit category.  A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in an Applied Academics course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either World Languages or Fine Arts to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“g” College Prep Elective – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, year-long approved course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

4570: International Business

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: Principles of Business.  International Business provides an introduction to economic, cultural, and political factors that influence business.  The course includes fundamentals of import/export business, business structures, business plans, trade relations, financial transactions, legal agreements, and global entrepreneurship.

 

4580: Principles of Business

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: None. This course focuses on the study of Economics, Finance, Commerce and Entrepreneurship.  It is intended as the basic or introductory course for those students seeking to establish a foundation for upper division courses in Business and other Social Sciences. Upon successful completion of this course many students plan on pursuing undergraduate studies in Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, Finance, Marketing or Pre-Law.

 

4640: Computer Applications

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: None.  An introductory computer course with an emphasis on computer literacy and the practical application of computer knowledge as used in business, industry and everyday life. Hands-on computer learning and the use of software programs and computer applications commonly used in school, business and industry will be stressed.  Common applications covered include Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft PowerPoint.

 

4710: Accounting 1

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: None.  Accounting 1 will enable the students to understand the "language" of business, the recording of financial transactions and their interpretation, the clarification of business procedures, the provision of skills needed for keeping financial records, and practice in setting up accounting systems.  Computerized accounting, investments and an introduction to taxes are also included in the curriculum.  The course is recommended for students who plan to enter college and major or minor in business administration, accounting, marketing, international business management, etc.

4720: Accounting 2

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Required: Accounting 1.  This advanced course is designed for students who want to broaden and improve knowledge about business procedures and the use of accounting records.  Students that complete this class usual go on to college and major in accounting or some other phase of business.

 

4850: Law

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: None.  The goal of this class is to provide students with the legal skills necessary for them to survive in today's world.  The course provides knowledge of how to protect one's rights while observing the rights of others.  Included are topics such as the nature and kinds of law, legal rights and responsibilities, contracts, crimes, torts, law for the minor, ethics, landlord and tenant relationships, real and personal property, bailments, and business organizations.

 

4860: Money & Banking

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended:  Principles of Business and International Business.  Money and Banking is a one-year, two semester elective course focusing on the study of markets and their supporting financial infrastructure. This course provides a framework for studying the role of money in our emerging global economy and the institutional characteristics of underlying banking systems and financial markets. The development of markets and financial intermediaries is considered within the context of the commercial, economic and financial history of the United States.  Students will explore the history of trade from the autarky and mercantilism practiced by colonial powers through current international arrangements supporting global interdependence and economic integration.  This course will also consider the macroeconomic issues of monetary policy as executed by the US Federal Reserve and European Central Bank.

 

4870: Principles of Marketing

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: None.  Principles of Marketing is a one-year, two semester course focusing on the science and art of building and managing profitable customer relationships.  Marketing’s central purpose is presented as demand management, the skills needed to manage the level, timing and composition of demand. Students will learn the necessity of attracting new customers by promising and delivering superior customer service in an environment continually being shaped by the two powerful forces of technology and globalization.  Students will study contributions to marketing by Peter Drucker, Ted Levitt, Philip Kotler, Regis McKenna and Geoffrey Moore, among others.

 

4880: Economics and Virtual Enterprise

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Virtual Enterprise (VE) is a simulated business that is set up and run by students.  With the guidance of the teacher and real-world business partners, the students determine the nature of their business, its products and services, its management and structures and learn the daily operation of a business.  Students will be involved in simulated on the job work experiences, including accounting, personnel administration, management and marketing. Emphasis is placed on using current business software, communications, and the Internet for business transactions. Additionally, students will run their own virtual checking account, will be receiving a virtual paycheck, and be required to pay virtual bills including rent, utilities and miscellaneous expenditures. Students will be responsible for having a grand opening for their business and have the opportunity to attend one of two (or more) trade fairs. Working collaboratively, students will develop and enhance oral and written communication skills through initiative, creativity and responsibility. All class experiences simulate those found in business and industry.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

English Elective courses are electives in the Applied Academics category.  A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in an Applied Academics course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either World Languages or Fine Arts to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“g” College Prep Elective – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, year-long approved course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

1350: Writing for Publication

Grades: 9-11

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Students have completed or are concurrently enrolled in freshman and/or sophomore English. Teacher recommendations are preferred. An English elective class for discerning students who wish to further develop advanced writing techniques, effective research-based and communication skills and to explore literature in both traditional and journalistic writing formats in addition to contemporary media resources and cross-curricular studies. The curriculum also provides instruction in photojournalism, principles of publication design, layout, graphics, marketing strategies, and technology, including desktop publishing and art programs as part of the total production process.

 

1360: Journalism

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: Successful completion of Writing for Publication and/or teacher recommendation.  An elective class for students who produce the student newspaper, assuming full responsibility for its development, production and marketing while meeting similar challenges to those experienced by the professional field. The curriculum also provides an opportunity to create a personal reading program representing the research focused on societal forces, trends and issues.

 

1370: Oral Composition 1,2,3,4

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: None.  Oral composition provides a literature-based curriculum integrating composition, both oral and written, as well as literary analysis. The course is unique because it is the only advanced class in the curriculum that provides direct instruction in public and interpersonal speaking and listening, as well as emphasis on oral expression, listening, and critical thinking in relation to both classic and contemporary literature. Students are expected to be self-directed and to apply their skills outside the classroom in a variety of contexts such as forensic competition and community service activities.

 

Industrial Technology offers you an opportunity to take courses that combine critical thinking skills and problem solving with mechanical and other hands-on technical experiences. The knowledge and skills attained in these classes assist you in achieving career goals, whether it be an entry-level job after high school, technical training at a community college, or a four-year college professional degree.

 

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Industrial Technology courses are electives in the Applied Academics category.  A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in an Applied Academics course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either World Languages or Fine Arts to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

 

UC ELIGIBILITY

“g” College Prep Elective – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, year-long approved course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

 

5110: Woodworking 1

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: None. A beginning machine woodworking course in which projects of a problem-solving nature are produced. Many basic areas of study are undertaken, such as the use of tools (hand and power), safety, wood industry, forestry, designing, finishing and other related information.

 

5120: Woodworking 2

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Wood 1. An advanced level of machine woodworking in which the student develops a design and builds furniture of a problem-solving nature. Some jigs are constructed and used in the completion of the project. Students learn in detail the many areas of study in woodworking through research on their project. More individual freedom is given students in the use of all equipment and selection of projects.

 

5130: Woodworking 3

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Wood 2. An advanced level of woodworking where a student designs and draws plans with greater emphasis on joinery and construction detail. More jigs and fixtures are constructed and used in the completion of projects. Students learn what occupations are available in the area of woodworking. Students are free to select projects and to use all equipment available in the wood shop.

 

5210: Drafting

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: None. This course is designed to cover all basic fundamentals of drafting: lettering, use of instruments, orthographic projection, sectional views, auxiliary views, simple revolutions and pictorial drawing. Sheet metal layout and architectural drafting are introduced. Methodologies used include computer assisted drafting.

 

5220: Engineering Drafting

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Drafting at high school level. This is a continuation of Drafting, presenting more advanced problems that deal with machine design and drafting practice, illustration techniques, engineering, geometry, welding drawings, piping drawings, gears and cams and the elements of structural drawing. Strategies include computer assisted drafting.

5230: Architectural Drafting

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Drafting at high school level. This course includes a development of architectural lettering, the study of construction principles and architectural details for both frame and masonry construction, the planning of a house and the preparation of a complete set of working drawings for a residence. Various lectures are given on construction, terms, heating, plumbing and new materials in the industry. When space is available, a scale model of the student’s design is constructed. Strategies include computer assisted drafting.

 

5410: Electronics 1

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: None. This course provides the student with exploratory experiences in the field of electronics and electricity. Emphasis is on basic electronic circuits, the use of hand tools and the application of test equipment to electronic testing. Students learn to make minor electrical repairs, to layout circuits and to read schematic diagrams.

 

5420: Electronics 2

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Electronics 1 and Algebra 1. This is a laboratory course in which a student develops theoretical knowledge and applies it to electronic circuitry. Fundamental theory and principles are explored through the use of various signal generators and test equipment. The student will study various semiconductors, power supplies and several types of amplifiers.

 

Living Skills courses provide you with the opportunities to develop and practice skills for managing personal, family and work responsibilities. The skills include decision-making, communication, team building, computation, critical thinking, time, money and resource management, value clarification, goal setting and self-esteem building. Life management, now and in the future, requires not only knowing the basics, but also knowing how to effectively apply these basic skills. You will discover and learn through hands-on, realistic, fun and challenging experiences.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Living Skills courses are electives in the Applied Academics category.  A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in an Applied Academics course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either World Languages or Fine Arts to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“g” College Prep Elective – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, year-long approved course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

5710: Introduction to Culinary Careers: Foods and Nutrition

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: None. This is a preparatory course addressing many aspects of food preparation including safety and sanitation, measurement basics, kitchen tools and uses, nutrition, basic food science, and of course meal planning and preparation. The goal of this course is to introduce the kitchen novice to the wonderful world of food and flavors. This course is open to all interested students.

 

5730: Culinary Food Science

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: Passing grade in Biology and Algebra 1. This course applies chemistry, biology, and basic scientific principles in analyzing the processing of food and food products, the preparation of recipes along with concepts of food preservation, the packaging and marketing of foods as well as discussions about scientific advances or consumer demands and the resulting affects on world food issues.  The course takes a hands-on approach to learning through the preparation of foods by understanding the “how” and “why” of a recipe, and develops a student’s knowledge of the role of food in respect to its nutritional, social, historical, environmental and industrial contexts using research, reasoning, and prior knowledge.  In accordance with the standards of Career Technical Education, the students will also learn about nutrition, sensory evaluation, and the safe handling of food through the use of written lab reports and kitchen lab experiments.

 

Living Skills ROP Courses

The following courses can be found in the Regional Occupational Program (ROP) section beginning on page 48 of this guide:

7760: Culinary Careers

7765: Culinary Careers 2: Hospitality & Management

 

Mathematics Electives

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Math Elective courses are electives in the Applied Academics category.  A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in an Applied Academics course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either World Languages or Fine Arts to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“g” College Prep Elective – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, year-long approved course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

 

2350: AP Computer Science A

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: B or better in Computer Programming JAVA; and B or better in Algebra 2 or higher math course; and strong computer and problem solving skills; with teacher recommendation.  This course is designed to serve as the equivalent of a one-semester, entry-level college course in computer science for students majoring in computer science, engineering, math, the sciences or business.   Students will create and debug original object-oriented programs, using JAVA, to solve problems by using adaptable and reusable algorithmic modules and data structures.  Students successfully completing this course are prepared to take the Computer Science A AP Exam. 

 

2370: Computer Programming JAVA

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Recommended: Successful completion of Algebra 1 or higher math course and previous computer use with teacher recommendation.  The course is designed to introduce the student to the study and writing of computer programs, with an emphasis on problem-solving and program design.  Analytical thinking skills and logic are emphasized.  The JAVA language is used with an emphasis on understanding universal programming concepts such as data types and data structures, selection, and iteration along with applications of programming for the Internet and programs written in an object-oriented paradigm.  Elementary study of digital computer hardware may be included.  This course is recommended for the college-bound student planning on a business, math or science major or for the student preparing for an AP Computer Science course.

 

Career Technical Education (CTE) and Regional Occupational Program (ROP) courses provide students with opportunities to explore and/or develop a career. Courses offered provide career/technical skills training and/or on-the-job training with work-based learning.  Some CTE/ROP courses may not be available every year.  Many of these courses are offered on other school campuses, but are open to students if scheduling permits.  Course locations are noted when possible.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

CTE/ROP courses are electives in the Applied Academics credit category.  A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in an Applied Academics course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either World Languages or Fine Arts to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“g” College Prep Elective – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, year-long approved course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

 

4760: Multimedia Design

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Location: Cupertino, Homestead

Recommended: None. This course focuses on the historical, theoretical, and cultural issues as related to the mass media and the Internet. In addition to theoretical and historical work, students will heighten their ability to critically analyze and create multimedia. Students will evaluate (verbally and in writing), design, create and present multimedia projects. Concepts and skills developed throughout the course are revisited and reinforced with each unit of instruction.

 

7530: Automotive Technology 1

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Fremont, Homestead

The Automotive Technology program is designed to provide pre-employment training to students for entry-level employment in the automotive service industry. Employment possibilities include parts assembly technician, technician helper, lube technician, tune-up technician and tire changer.  Automotive Technology 1 provides students both theory and hands on experience in the following areas: shop safety, brakes, automatic transmission, electrical systems, suspension systems, air conditioning/heating and diagnosis and trouble-shooting repair procedures. Job search skills, business ethics, appropriate communication skills for the marketplace, and job retention skills, including attendance, punctuality and proper work attire will be reinforced at all levels of instruction.

 

7535: Automotive Technology 2

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Fremont, Homestead

The Automotive Technology program is designed to provide pre-employment training to students for entry-level employment in the automotive service industry. Employment possibilities include parts assembly technician, technician helper, lube technician, tune-up technician and tire changer.  Automotive Technology 2 offers advanced topics in engine performance, carburetors and fuel injection systems.

 

7615: Technical Writing

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Cupertino, Fremont, Homestead

This course is an expansion of office computing, incorporating the use of a computer-based system and software with graphic capabilities to produce publication materials.  Students will integrate typeset text and graphics on the page using accepted writing, publication and presentation techniques.  This course is designed to prepare students for entry-level employment in the newspaper-publishing field. Students will produce desktop-published camera/copy ready masters for reproduction.

 

7635: Advanced Multimedia

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Monta Vista

This course is designed to provide students with advanced skills in a wide variety of multimedia applications in use in today’s internet, video, digital, and publishing industries. Emphasis will be placed on career preparation skills associated with printed and electronic media such as web pages, magazine and newspaper advertisements, composite photography, video editing, 3D rendering, and business presentations.

 

7640: TV/Film/Video

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Fremont, Homestead

This course will prepare the student to work in the audio-video production and multimedia industry by producing streamed audio and video on the Internet using digital and advanced animation production techniques.  Work-based learning and special projects will provide experience with multi-camera coverage, post-production, and animation support services, and a range of industry applications.

 

7650: Engineering Technology

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Location: Lynbrook, Monta Vista

This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of technologies used in engineering such as robotics, electronics, hydraulics, pneumatics and CAD/CAM. Student teams will progress through an articulated modular instructional system. Scientific principles, math concepts and communication skills are taught through an activity-oriented approach. Students will combine interdisciplinary skills to produce a product-using computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems.

 

7655: Biotechnology

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: d

Location: Fremont

This course prepares students for careers involving laboratory sciences and the biotechnology industry (Health Services Cluster). Students learn procedures and laboratory skills, which will make them effective lab technicians, Topics covered include DNA manipulation and micropipetting, proper washing and sterilizing procedures, plating and culturing techniques. Sound laboratory instruction and safety will be stressed. Students will learn to read protocols and do technical writing, use resources and work in team-based learning. Background material regarding DNA methods and usefulness, science and societal issues will be considered, and each student will produce a portfolio. Career paths and opportunities for further education will be explored through associations with industry mentors and field trips to local lab sites.

 

7685: Commercial Art/Graphic Design

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Monta Vista

Students in this program will be provided with classroom and hands-on experience with paste-up, layout, lettering, illustration, and production of mock-up ads, logos and brochures for newspaper and small businesses. Commercial art teaches commercial production techniques needed for newspaper, print shop, or publishing work.

 

7730: Training for Transitions

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Cupertino, Fremont, Homestead

Required: Approval of instructor. This program is for adolescent students at risk and/or in special education aged 16 to 21(up to two years). The importance of community based and on-the-job training is an effective means of developing solid job skills and exploring career options. We utilize the classroom in conjunction with job sites to expose the student to work opportunities. The students receive school credits toward their graduation. This is a course study – the program is broken into three (3) stages as follows:

  • Classroom Instruction
  • Community Classroom
  • Cooperative Vocational Education

 

7760: Culinary Careers

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Cupertino, Fremont, Homestead

Recommended: Intro to Culinary Careers: Foods and Nutrition. Culinary Careers is an intermediate course in food preparation. The student will review safety, sanitation, nutrition, and time management. This course delves deeper into meal planning and offers more opportunities for creativity and recipe creation.  Culinary Careers will introduce aspects of the restaurant business. The goal is to allow the students to explore their interest in the culinary arts for personal enjoyment or as a possible career option.

 

7765: Culinary Careers 2: Hospitality & Management

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Fremont

Recommended: Intro to Culinary Careers: Foods and Nutrition & Culinary Careers. This is an advanced course which encompasses all aspects of the restaurant business including food preparation, safety and sanitation, menu planning, and nutrition. This course will prepare students for an above entry-level job in restaurants, or for an institution of higher learning for a career in Food Service. Students will refine their cooking skills, sanitation practices and creativity by group and independent lab work, reading and writing assignments, classroom projects and home cooking assignments. This course will prepare students who are interested in pursuing ServSafe certification.

 

7770: Stagecraft Tech

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Fremont, Homestead, Monta Vista

An instructional program that emphasizes the techniques and processes involved in stage management, prop construction, lighting, the setup and operation of sound systems, and the operation of projection equipment.  The program develops basic construction techniques for stage property and scenery; affords practice in stage crew work, which includes the erection and striking of scenery; and provides an overview of related occupations in radio and television.

 

7790: Studio Art

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10 (repeatable)

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Lynbrook

Students will focus on building their personal portfolio and gain entrepreneurial skills required to become a successful artist. Advanced Visual Communications coordinates 2-D and 3-D studio work and cultural studies together with an emphasis on careers in the art field.  Selected cultures of Meso-American, Italian, German, French, Middle Eastern and Asian art will be introduced and students will produce projects that relate to each unique culture to be included in their portfolio.  Language and cultural studies will be taught on a daily basis so as to appreciate historical and cultural differences.  The art elements and principles of design composition serve as a foundation for each unit covered and attention will be given to visual studio work.  Students will gain knowledge and an appreciation for various art forms and entrepreneurship skills that will lead to a successful career in the visual communications field.

 

7880: Administration of Justice

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Homestead

This course will help the students acquire the basic knowledge of the law enforcement profession. This program is an articulated, feeder program to community college police science programs. In the course of one year, the students will gain a thorough knowledge of the role of the police in society, including crime evidence, laws of arrest, and overall protection objectives. Successful completion of this training will provide you with a good background for acceptance into police training program offered at community colleges.

 

7900: Athletic Training/Sports Medicine

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Location: Fremont

This program is designed to educate student in the field of Sports Medicine and other allied health professions. The field of Sports Medicine will be explored, including care and prevention of injuries, protective taping and wrapping techniques, stretching methods, overall wellness, and basic anatomy and physiology. Additional hours outside the classroom to further enhance their learning, and give their instructor another method of evaluating student progress.

 

8040: Work Experience                                

Grades: 11-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Students who are employed may choose to enroll in Work Experience with priority given to seniors whose graduation is at risk.  Each campus has a staff member who coordinates the program.  Throughout their time in the program, students develop and complete various components of a structured portfolio, which show the abilities, knowledge, and skills gained through Work Experience.  Credit is granted on a semester basis and based on a combination of completion of related instruction, attendance at class meetings, employer/teacher evaluations, and hours of employment.

 

8340: Introduction to Engineering Design

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Location: Fremont

The major focus of this introductory engineering course is to expose students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards and technical documentation found in engineering-related careers. Students use 3D solid modeling design software to help them create solutions to proposed problems. Students learn how to document their work and communicate their ideas to peers and members of the professional community.

 

8270: Principles of Engineering

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Location: Fremont

Recommended: Introduction to Engineering Design. This survey course exposes students to some of the major concepts they will encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. Students will have an opportunity to investigate engineering and high-tech careers, develop problem-solving skills, and understand engineering concepts. They will apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to real-world engineering problems. They will document their work and communicate solutions. Students work in both lab and classroom settings using industry-standard software and the VEX® Robotics platform.

 

8260: Digital Electronics

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g (pending)

Location: Fremont

Recommended: Recommended: Introduction to Engineering Design; Principles of Engineering; Physics or Earth Science. This course explores the foundation of modern electronic devices such as mobile phones, and MP3 players, computers.  Students are introduced to applied logic through computer simulation software that allows them to construct and test digital circuits.

 

 

Art

Music

Theatre and Performing Arts

These courses all satisfy the FUHSD Fine Arts credit category.

 

Art

The visual arts are part of the “basics.” They communicate forcefully and directly. Students who learn the symbolic structure of the visual arts can respond to and symbolize their experiences in ways that are not dependent on the coding and decoding of verbal language. These skills are especially important in the American culture where information is transmitted both visually and verbally. Experiences in the visual arts lead to the formation of enduring attitudes, values, and satisfying accomplishments.

The University of California requires one year of Visual/Performing Arts.  Courses with the “f” notation for the UC requirement have been approved as meeting UC entrance requirements.  The California State University System (CSU) also requires one year of a Visual/Performing Art course for admission to their system.  All courses approved by UC are also approved by CSU as meeting the Visual/Performing Arts admissions requirement.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Art courses are electives under Fine Arts.  A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in a Fine Arts course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either World Languages or Applied Academics to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“f” Visual and Performing Arts (VPA) – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, yearlong approved VPA course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

6110: Art 1                                

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: None. This is an introductory course that provides the student an opportunity to explore the elements of design such as line, shape, color, form, value and texture through the use of various media including drawing, painting printing making and collage.  Basic visual literacy and visual communication skills will be instructed. A basic survey of art history will be covered.

 

6120: Art 2

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: C or better in Art 1. This is an intermediary art course. Further refinement of drawing and painting skills will be the primary focus, but various art making practices and new media may be introduced such as pastel painting, colored pencil, mixed media, scratchboard, and mask painting. Visual literacy and visual communication skills will be further developed.  Historical and contemporary topics will be evident in student work and /or through class discussion.

 

6130: Art 3

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: C or better in Art 2.  This is an advanced level course focused around a specialized area of art and / or around the exploration of a variety of media and techniques.  In addition, Students will be directed in developing their own creative voice and work for a portfolio. Advanced visual literacy and visual communication skills will be further developed. Historical and contemporary topics will be evident in student work and /or through class discussion.

 

 

6140: Art 4

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended:  C or better in Art 3.   This is an advanced course that is focused on creative problem solving and visual communication. Students in this course will explore and refine a field(s) of concentration such as drawing or painting or appropriate media and work in depth toward the development of a portfolio that may be used for entrance into an art school or for career oriented purposes. Students who enroll should be capable of self-direction and independent study. Historical and contemporary topics will be evident in student work and/or through class discussion. This course is designed to provide opportunities for students to build their art-making skill sets through hands-on practice, critiques and the study of the history and purpose of visual art.

 

6190: Photography 1

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: None.  This is an introductory art course where students will learn to use the Elements and Principles of Art and Design such as line, space, value, texture, balance, and contrast to create a well-composed photograph. Basic camera operation will be covered.  Experiences working with traditional photographic methods such as film may be explored as well as digital-based images or a combination of the two.  A basic history of photography will also be covered.

 

6200: Photography 2

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: C or better in Photography 1.  This is an advanced photography course where either traditional or digital media will be explored if not both. A variety of photographic media may be explored such as film, digital editing software, image transfers, etc. Students will be directed in developing their own creative voice, and work toward a portfolio. Historical and contemporary topics will be evident in student work and /or through class discussion.

 

6210: 3D Design 1

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: None. This is a basic design course for students primarily interested in three-dimensional materials. Design for both aesthetic and functional objects is emphasized. Whether the objects are utilitarian or aesthetic, a regard for quality of workmanship and design is stressed. Not only do students explore a variety of media such as clay, leather, wood, metal, enamels, etc., they also gain an appreciation for handcrafted articles as they reflect our past and present culture.

 

6220: 3D Design 2

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: C or better in 3-D Design 1. Students will further their knowledge and appreciation of design with more depth and complexity, as well as increase their skills in handling materials and tools. Various new media are introduced and experimentation and individualized instruction are encouraged. The skills learned are useful for future employment in an art-oriented occupation, for communicating ideas and preparing for further education.

 

6230: 3D Design 3

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: C or better in 3-D Design 2. For the advanced design student who has professional or vocational goals in a particular area. The student will develop a high level of skill in a specific medium. The student will be encouraged to make contact with professional people in their specific fields and research techniques in the medium, culminating with a brief report. Specific projects will result from a student/teacher conference that will outline the projects to be completed each semester.

6240: 3D Design 4

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: C or better in 3-D Design 3. This course is for the advanced student of three-dimensional art who has professional or vocational goals in a particular area. The student will develop a high level of skill in a specific medium, research techniques in the medium and be encouraged to make contact with professionals in the area, culminating with a brief report. The projects to be completed each semester will be outlined in a student/teacher conference.

 

6310: Ceramics 1 (uses same course number as Ceramics 2)

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: None.  This is an introductory art course centered on developing hand-building techniques such as pinch, slab and coil.  Introductory work on the potter’s wheel may be explored.  Techniques in underglazing, inlay and carving will be explored. In addition, a variety of glazing techniques will be demonstrated.

 

6310: Ceramics 2 (uses same course number as Ceramics 1)

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: C or better in Ceramics 1. The student will design and produce a variety of forms that utilize hand-building methods and wheel-throwing techniques. Advanced surface decoration will be explored such as inlay, texture and stamping,

 

6320: Ceramics 3 (uses same course number as Ceramics 4)

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: C or better in Ceramics 2.  The student will continue refinement in basic hand-building and potter’s wheel techniques. Exploration in decorating methods and self-directed projects will be developed.

 

6320: Ceramics 4 (uses same course number as Ceramics 3)

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: C or better in Ceramics 3. The student will work with a developing style and strive for a specific direction such as hand building, wheel, sculpture or a combination thereof. More emphasis will be placed on creative solutions, advanced decorating methods that may include glaze application, glaze calculations, glaze mixing and firing techniques.

 

6440: AP Studio Art: Drawing

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: B or better in Art 2, teacher recommendation or evaluation of student portfolio. It is designed for the art student who is seriously interested in art. The curriculum will include the development of a portfolio that may be used for college admission and submitted to the College Board for the AP Examination. Students will be required to complete homework assignments outside of class and to maintain a sketchbook.

 

 

 

Music is basic in the learning experience for all students in the elementary and secondary schools of California. A balanced and comprehensive education program requires that music be included as a discrete discipline in the visual and performing arts curriculum. California is rich in cultural diversity with a population that represents all regions of the world. Strong music education programs contribute significantly to the development of knowledge, understanding and appreciation of this society in which we live. Effective music instruction is organized to respond to this need and must meet this challenge.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Music courses are electives under Fine Arts.  A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in a Fine Arts course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either World Languages or Applied Academics to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“f” Visual and Performing Arts (VPA) – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, yearlong approved VPA course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

7030: B Choir                                

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: None. This choir is a beginning vocal group. It contains the basic introduction of the first year of high school vocal music. The techniques of vocal production and sight singing are explored. This choir performs for local school and community events.

 

7040: Advanced Treble Choir

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Audition or approval of instructor. The course content includes work on tone production and quality, breathing, diction and general musicianship and the study and performance of three and four part music for treble voices. This choir performs for local school and community events.

 

7060: A Choir

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Audition or approval of instructor. The students will experience a large mixed choir that provides the opportunity to perform large choral works. This choir performs for local school and community events.

 

7070: Vocal Jazz

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Audition or approval of instructor. This is a small, prestigious group. The music performed includes contemporary and popular songs in jazz arrangements with keyboard, drums, bass and guitar accompaniment. They often perform for functions in the community and at Jazz Festivals. See your guidance assistant principal for UC information on this course.

 

7080: Small Mixed Vocal Ensembles

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Audition or approval of instructor.. This is a small musical group of students who perform on occasions when a larger group would be excessive. The music performed covers different styles from Renaissance to contemporary.

 

7120: Concert Band

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Approval of instructor. Refinement of tone and a more advanced understanding of basic performance techniques are stressed. Alternate and trill fingering are studied. The intonation, balance and blend required in ensemble playing are developed. Transposition and elementary music theory as related to band work are introduced; terms concerning tempo, dynamics and expression are emphasized through the reading of many compositions of different styles and from different periods in music history. The concert band performs concerts.

 

7130: Symphonic Band

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Audition or approval of instructor. This is a continuation of Concert Band work, with more detail in individual techniques and skills. It provides continued study of band literature, with stress on a larger and more challenging repertoire. The symphonic band performs concerts.

 

7140: Wind Ensemble

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Audition or approval of instructor. This select group of about 50 is formed by audition only. It is for the serious, advanced musician only, and performs more difficult high school and some college-level music. The wind ensemble performs concerts.

 

7180: Jazz Ensemble

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Audition or approval of instructor. This is a small, instrumental musical group of approximately 12 to 24 students who perform a variety of jazz styles. The music performed covers different styles including Swing, Rock and Latin. The group performs at a variety of concerts.

 

7240: Orchestra

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Audition or approval of instructor. The course content involves the study and performance of ensemble and orchestra literature, intermediate and advanced string technique and musicianship.

 

7250: Chamber Orchestra

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Audition or approval of instructor. This course is offered to advanced level students who will study and perform string/orchestral literature for continuing individual technique development on his/her instrument.  Advanced/professional level music will be studied and performed from all historical periods of music.

 

7320: Music Genesis

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: None. This course is open to all students interested in the basic elements and concepts of music through the study of Rock, Jazz and Classical music. No previous musical knowledge is required. Class content is based on listening and music videos.

 

7350: AP Music Theory

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Ability to read music. This course is modeled after first-year college theory courses and is for those who want to expand their musical horizons or consider further study in music. Eighteenth century harmony and analysis are studied along with arrangement, orchestration and musicianship.

 

The theatre arts emphasize the use of the intellect as well as the development of sensitivity, creativity, and the capacity to make reasoned, aesthetic decisions while exploring the range of human experience. As language is a primary component of drama, students develop poise, confidence, ease, and versatility in verbal presentation. There are several ways to enter into theatre arts, but always these courses result in successful interactions, performances, and products.

The University of California requires one year of Visual/Performing Arts.  Courses with the “f” notation for the UC requirement have been approved as meeting UC entrance requirements.  The California State University System (CSU) also requires one year of a Visual/Performing Art course for admission to their system.  All courses approved by UC are also approved by CSU as meeting the Visual/Performing Arts admissions requirement.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Theater and Performing Arts courses are electives under Fine Arts.  A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in a Fine Arts course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either World Languages or Applied Academics to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“f” Visual and Performing Arts (VPA) – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, yearlong approved VPA course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

2810: Dance 1                                 

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: PE 9. Dance 1 is based in jazz techniques is and is open to all students.  Students will also study ballet, modern, musical theater, and dances of different cultures.  The specific goals of this course include: increased muscle control and body awareness, body alignment and placement, musical rhythms, dance techniques and terminology, dance sequences, ensemble dance, and choreography.  Students will be required to maintain a written portfolio that will contain vocabulary handouts, musical critiques, and self-evaluations.  Students are expected to perform in two dance concerts.

 

6710: Drama

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: None. This course is for those students who want introductory training in acting. Class emphasis is on voice, movement, improvisation, mental preparation, script preparation and various acting techniques.  Course study may include the history of world theatre and theatre’s contributions to world cultures with representative readings of excellent plays from all cultures and eras; the formulation of criteria for personal evaluation of dramatic literature, performance and production; continued instruction in voice, staging and character analysis; playwriting techniques; directing techniques; rehearsal and performance for an audience.

 

6720: Advanced Drama

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Drama. This course is for those students who want more advanced training in acting.  Course work emphasizes reading, viewing, performing and analyzing dramatic works. Course study may include the history of world theatre and theatre’s contributions to world cultures with representative readings of excellent plays from all cultures and eras; the formulation of criteria for personal evaluation of dramatic literature, performance and production; continued instruction in voice, staging and character analysis; playwriting techniques; directing techniques; rehearsal and performance for an audience.

6730: Advanced Drama Honors

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: f

Recommended: Advanced Drama. This course is for those students who are most interested and practiced in studying acting and the theater.  Course study will be based on the skills and knowledge developed in the previous Drama courses and will help students to continue on to more advanced levels of dramatic study.  Students will be expected to have a solid foundation of dramatic principles and practices.

In an ever-changing and interconnected world, students need to develop cross-cultural understanding and communication skills in order to enhance their ability to compete in a global economy. The primary goal of the World Languages Department is to provide students the opportunity to develop proficiency in a language other than English. World Language courses are aligned to the California Content Standards for World Languages and to the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards.

Students will develop communicative competence in the target language, both in spoken and written form. Classroom instruction is conducted primarily in the target language, with an emphasis on real-world applications so students develop their ability to interact with speakers of the target language. Diverse learning styles are taken into consideration when developing class activities. Students will build their understanding of the structure of the target language by drawing comparisons to their own languages, which in turn will enhance their awareness of their own language structure. Through their study of the language, students will learn the cultural heritage of other lands and become acquainted with customs and thoughts of other people.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

World Languages is a selective elective area. A student must earn 10 credits in two out of three selective elective areas (Fine Arts, World Languages and Applied Academics).  For example, if a student earns 10 credits in a World Languages course, he/she would still need 10 credits from either Fine Arts or Applied Academics to satisfy the graduation requirement.  

UC ELIGIBILITY

“e” Language Other than English (LOTE) – 2 years required, 3 years recommended. A student must earn 20 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in the same language other than English.

FUHSD offers courses in four languages: Chinese, French, Japanese, and Spanish. Course descriptions are listed by level and apply to all languages unless otherwise specified.

Level 1

4010: Japanese 1, 4110: French 1, 4310:  Spanish 1, 4410: Chinese 1                       

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: e

Recommended: None.  Students will learn to address elements of daily life in both oral and written form, gain a new perspective on the world as they are introduced to other cultures and traditions, and learn the fundamental grammatical structures of the language to convey meaning.  Class activities will allow students to become proficient in reading, writing, listening and speaking the target language for real-world language use.

Note: This course will be offered if interest and availability allows.

 

Level 2

4020: Japanese 2, 4120: French 2, 4320:  Spanish 2, 4420: Chinese 2                      

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: e

Recommended: C or better in Level 1 or the recommendation of an instructor. The primary goal continues to be the development of communicative competence. Students will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge and to acquire new information about the target language and culture. They continue to build their language skills through more advanced reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities.

Note: This course will be offered if interest and availability allows.

Level 3

4030: Japanese 3, 4130: French 3, 4330:  Spanish3, 4430: Chinese 3                     

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: e

Recommended:  C or better in Level 2, or the recommendation of an instructor.  Students will learn more advanced vocabulary and grammar, and will improve communicative competence in the target language.  More formal writing skills begin to be developed. Cultural study promotes a deeper understanding of the people who speak the language. They will begin to develop the ability to understand the language spoken at the pace of a native speaker. The course will be conducted primarily in the target language.

Note: This course will be offered if interest and availability allows.

 

Level 4 Honors

4040: Japanese 4 H, 4140: French 4 H, 4340:  Spanish 4 H, 4440: Chinese 4 H             

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: e

Recommended: C or better in Level 3, or the recommendation of an instructor. The course includes advanced grammar and vocabulary.    The goal will continue to be communicative competence, with an emphasis on understanding and using more complex and precise language.  The students read and respond to a variety of texts in the target language to reinforce and expand their language skills.  There is a focus on writing well-structured responses to a variety of prompts.  The study of culture continues to be an integral part of the course. Level 4 Honors is conducted entirely in the target language.

Note: This course will be offered if interest and availability allows.

 

Level 5 AP

4050: AP Japanese Language & Culture, 4150: AP French Language & Culture, 4350:  AP Spanish Language & Culture, 4450: AP Chinese Language & Culture             

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: e

Recommended: C or better in Level 4 Honors, or the recommendation of an instructor. The Advanced Placement course aims to develop overall fluency in the language. Students will continue to expand and refine their skills with college level coursework. The course prepares students to demonstrate their advanced level of proficiency across three communicative modes: interpersonal (interactive communication), interpretive (receptive communication) and presentational (productive communication).  Students will hone their ability to respond to written material, both fiction and non-fiction, as well as a variety of multimedia. One of the goals of the course is to prepare students for the AP Language Exam.  A student may receive college credit by earning a passing grade on this national exam.

Note: This course will be offered if interest and availability allows.

 

Specialized World Language Courses

4324: Spanish for Spanish Speakers (Spanish 2)

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: e

Recommended:  Recommendation of an instructor.  This course is for students who already speak Spanish, but who would like to improve their academic literacy skills in the language.  Students develop their reading and writing skills in Spanish.  At the same time, there is intensive work on correcting common grammatical errors, in both spoken and written form.  Students develop academic language through content. Students who successfully complete the course receive credit for Spanish 2 and are guided toward advanced Spanish.

Note:  This course will be offered if interest and availability allows.

The Fremont Union High School District offers a selection of Non-Departmental elective courses that are not connected to any of the other departments listed in this guide.  These courses offer students opportunities and/or supports that are not subject-specific.  Some of these courses require that students meet specific criteria or must be selected to enable enrollment.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Non-departmental elective courses may be applied to the 60 credits needed in the Elective area.

UC ELIGIBILITY

“g” College Prep Elective – 1 year required. A student must earn 10 credits and a grade of “C” or higher in a single, yearlong approved course. See individual course descriptions for specific information about UC/CSU eligibility.

 

8070: CAHSEE Support (Math) and 8080: CAHSEE Support (English)

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended:  School placement.  The CAHSEE support course is designed to provide assistance to students who have not passed one/both sections of the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE).  The course uses diagnostic assessments to determine areas of strength and need for each student. The work of the course provides intensive instruction to meet the specific needs of individual pupils.  Intensive instruction will include providing students with such things as test taking skills development and targeted remediation of skill deficiency related to specific content standards.

 

8100: Perspectives through Multimedia

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Required: Enrollment in this class is by application/selection only. In this elective course, students will study specific themes from multiple perspectives and an array of media that include text, audio, still images, animation, video and movies, music and songs, and interactivity content forms. Students will learn to communicate their own perspectives and demonstrate their learning through their own modes of communication: analytical and creative writing, class discussions, videos, presentations, art, and performance. Students will also develop their meta-cognition, learning strategies, literacy skills, and academic language. As part of this course, students will be exposed to a variety of enriching experiences: hands-on and interactive activities, project-based learning, field trips, guest speakers, and collaboration with students from other classes, such as Leadership and ROP.

 

8290: Leadership

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Required: Students must hold some type of office through elections or interviews. Leadership is a “How To” course where traditional and nontraditional student leaders and potential student leaders will develop skills that will be utilized in planning and presenting schoolwide activities and programs. Community involvement will be expected via activities in the elementary schools such as conflict resolution, peer tutoring, performances, or presentations, as well as attendance at local government meetings and assistance with community programs such as food drives and multicultural activities.  Other examples of activities may include but are not limited to: rallies, lunch-time activities, dances, student and staff recognition, homecoming, Students will be active participants in planning and presenting the course and their work will be assessed through actual presentations and portfolio development. This course is open to all students and is repeatable.

 

8300: Communications in the 21st Century

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Required: Enrollment in this class is by application/selection only. In this elective course, students will acquire the skills to be well-prepared students, professionals, and citizens of the 21st century. This course is intended to help students to access core subject areas, strengthen academic skills, develop problem solving skills, enhance communication skills, and increase confidence in their ability to succeed. By progressing through the different steps of problem-based learning, students will learn to identify the problem, generate ideas, organize ideas, derive learning needs, organize learning needs, test ideas, and develop conclusions. Through problem-based learning, students will be active participants in their own learning, make connections to specific, real-life scenarios, understand issues thoroughly, set goals for different solutions, negotiate through different views, interact with peers and other experts; and educate others with their learning. Through this process, students will learn perseverance, understand the purpose for learning, and see relevance to their individual lives that could lead to career exploration.

 

Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)

8410: AVID 9, 8420: AVID 10, 8430: AVID 11, 8440: AVID 12

Grades: 9-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Required: Enrollment in this course is by application/selection only. The AVID course is designed to offer students the opportunity to develop their study skills, enhance their organizational techniques, and refine their academic preparation for college. The focus of skill building will be in the areas of expository writing, note-taking, oral communication, and collaborative inquiry. This class is designed for capable and determined students whose academic success in rigorous courses may not reflect their ability. An application and selection process is required for enrollment.

 

Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)

8450: AVID Senior Seminar

Grades: 12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: g

Required: Enrollment in this class is by application/selection only. Students must have been enrolled in AVID elective at least one year prior to this class. Co-requisite: Enrollment in at least one Honors or Advanced Placement course or in a college transferable course accepted by the UC/CSU.

 

The AVID Senior Seminar is part of a two-year interdisciplinary course for AVID juniors and seniors. It is organized around the theme of “Leadership as a Catalyst for Change in Society”.  Students study, in depth, exceptional leaders in contemporary society and examine the effect that these individuals have on culture, politics, education, history, science and the arts. Additionally, this course is emphasizes rhetorical reading, analytical writing, collaborative discussion strategies, tutorial, inquiry, study groups, preparation for college entrance and placement exams, college study skills and test taking strategies.

 

School Service Tutor

8400: Engage Tutor, 8460: AVID Tutor, 9080: Bilingual Tutor, 9090: Student Tutor

Grades: 11-12

Units: 0-10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Permission of supervising teacher/staff and completion of tutor training workshop if offered. This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to give school service by tutoring special needs students during a regularly scheduled class or students in the regular program who only need academic assistance. Students are also expected to give time to tutoring outside of the regularly scheduled class. Students have the opportunity to learn about different learning styles, to value diversity, to give service and to explore teaching as a career.

 

School Staff/Teacher Assistant

9020: Student Clerk, 9030: Teacher Assistant, 9040: Food Services Assistant, 9050: Lab Assistant, 9060: Media Assistant, 9070: Tech Assistant

Grades: 10-12

Units: 10

UC/CSU Requirement: N/A

Recommended: Approval of staff member student will work for. Students enrolled in these courses will work with teachers and clerical staff and receive work simulation experiences.

Students may earn a maximum of 20 credits in these classes during their 4 years of high school.

 

The purpose of the Guidance Program is to assist students with their academic planning so they graduate on schedule. Through thoughtful planning of their academic program along with career development activities we help students develop a direction for their life, beyond the attainment of a high school diploma. The majority of guidance services are delivered through group presentations in the classroom. Certificated Guidance Counselors, Assistant Principals, and the College and Career Liaisons conduct these presentations. The Guidance team is available to students and their families for individual appointments. We recommend the use of software and other printed resources for career and college planning which are available in the Career Center and other locations at their school of attendance.

The Guidance Program

Orientation

Ninth Grade

The emphasis for the freshman year is on establishing a “Good Beginning.” Classroom presentations by guidance staff, peers and other speakers introduce students to many facets of high school. Freshmen learn to access a wide range of personal, academic and social options and are acquainted with course selections compatible with career paths.

Exploration

Tenth Grade

A world of choices opens to sophomore students as they begin choosing the academic and career paths to pursue after high school. Curriculum choices become a major focus for sophomores as they reflect on their progress and future goals. Alternative ways to earn credit or diplomas and options to obtain specialized training are introduced at this level.

Decision-Making

Eleventh Grade

As students enter the junior year, they begin making more definitive decisions about post high school plans. Guidance activities include more specific information about college and other educational alternatives. Career Center speakers and evening workshops offer students and parents information about careers, colleges and financial aid.

Transitions

Twelfth Grade

The senior year is a time for students to look to the future and make one of the most significant “transitions” of their lives. Information presented includes 4-year colleges, community college transfer and career programs, trade and technical schools, military programs, apprenticeship programs and entry-level jobs.


Important Guidance Information

A semester class is worth 5 units; a year class (two semesters) is worth 10 units. Most students earn 30 units each semester.

Failed classes (grade of F) earn no units. Required classes that are failed must be repeated until they are passed.  Classes in which a student earns a D grade will count towards graduation requirements, but they will not count for college eligibility.

Courses that are repeated earn units only once, unless otherwise noted in the course description. Example: A student earns a D in Algebra 1 and then repeats the course the next year earning a B. The D grade will remain on the permanent record but will earn no units. The B grade will earn 5 units. The higher grade will be used to calculate the total GPA. A minimum grade of C is required for college eligibility.

College eligibility may be met in selected courses with the end of course grade even if the first semester grade is lower than a C. Consult your Guidance Counselor or Assistant Principal for specific course listings.

The 9-12 Academic Grade Point Average (GPA) includes all grades in all academic courses for the full four years of high school. The 10–12 Academic GPA is used for eligibility for college.

Fremont Union High School District Graduation Requirements

A student must earn a minimum 220 units, meeting specific course and subject area requirements, and must pass both sections of the California High School Exit Exam in order to receive a high school diploma:

English

40 units

Social Studies: including World History, US History, US Government, and Economics

30 units

Mathematics: including Algebra and Geometry

20 units

Science: including Life and Physical

20 units

Physical Education

20 units

Electives: additional units taken in any department meet this requirement

70 units

Selective Electives: students must complete 10 units each in two (2) of the following three (3) areas:

     Applied Academics: Career Technical Education/ROP, Business, Computer

                   Programming, Industrial Technology, Living Skills, Work Experience   

     Visual/Performing Arts: Art, Music, Theatre Arts

     World Languages: Chinese, French, Japanese, Spanish

20 units

 

California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE)

Beginning with the class of 2006, students must pass the California High School Exit Exam to earn a high school diploma.  The first opportunity to take the exam will happen during the spring of the 10th grade year.  Students who do not pass either part of the exam (English Language Arts or Math) will have opportunities to retake the exam in future years. 

California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE)

Students can earn the legal equivalent of a high school diploma by proving proficiency in basic skills through the California High School Proficiency Examination.

Note: Passing CHSPE does not exempt a student from attending school unless he or she is 16 or over and has verified parental permission to leave early. Contact your Guidance Counselor or Assistant Principal for more information.

General Education Development (GED)

Students aged 18 and older, who do not have a high school diploma, are eligible to obtain a General Education Development (GED) certificate. Instruction and counseling for this five-part exam are available through our Adult Education facility. Call (408) 522-2700 for more information.

 

Fremont Union High School District offers a variety of alternative education programs. Each unique, innovative program provides specialized opportunities that lead to high school graduation, diploma equivalency testing, continuing educational opportunities and/or vocational/career training. Each program is set up on a voluntary basis allowing the student to self-select according to perceived needs. All programs require special applications and most require student-parent interviews.

Each alternative program is unique in its structure and method for reaching individual needs. Each also provides a strong instructional program based on district objectives and district wide curricular guidelines. Through the process of meeting different needs along varied avenues, the district provides the best education possible for all students.

The directory below serves as a resource to administrators, parents, and students to explore opportunities to develop educational plans for students who need special arrangements, creative and innovative programs to complete their education.

Adult Education – Concurrent Enrollment

A program offered as an additional opportunity for 12th grade students to make up credits in English and social studies.  Classes are available to 11th grade students on a space available basis.  Classes are held at Fremont and Cupertino High School after school.  Students must register by completing an application with their high school Assistant Principal or Guidance Counselor.

Adult Education – GED Prep

High school students who are at least 17 1/2 may be released from high school to attend the GED Preparation Program.  The program is designed to prepare students to pass the GED.  GED classes are held in the mornings and evenings at the Adult Education Center.

Adult Education – GRADs

A program which leads to an adult high school diploma.  Students have the option of a traditional seat-time class or independent study.  GRADs is open to adults who are a minimum 18 years of age and whose high school class has graduated.  Call the Adult Education Center for an appointment to enroll.

College Now

College Now is open only to seniors and places them on the De Anza College campus for their senior year.  The students are considered co-enrolled at the home high school as well as De Anza College.  These are students who exhibit high levels of maturity and responsibility and are ready to leave the high school campus.  A GPA of at least 3.5 is required as well as placement into the EWRT 1A English course as determined by the De Anza English placement test.

Community Day School

A small essential school designed to meet the educational needs of expelled students, and students transitioning from the juvenile justice system.  The program is located in the Educational Options Center directly behind the District Office. The primary mode of instruction is direct teaching in all major subject areas. Meets five days per week, six hours a day.

Customized Learning Program

An alternative program designed for students who want to complete credits towards a high school diploma in a modified independent study environment. Students will be enrolled in a 2 hour per day ‘learning recovery’ class. Utilizing the Odysseyware online platform, small group work and in-class projects, students will have the opportunity to complete high school credits needed for graduation.  Students will be expected to spend an additional 3-4 hours a day in diploma-track activities. Students will work with the CLP teacher to customize a schedule to complete these additional credits using community college classes, home high school classes, Work Experience, internships etc.

EXCEL

A credit recovery course created to provide students with the opportunity to earn the amount of high school credits needed to graduate.  A Guidance Counselor and/or AP determine admission to the program.  The course(s) of focus are determined and the student, parent and EXCEL teacher sign a contract.

Home Teaching

Teachers provide instruction to students who are medically excused from school due to a temporary but extended medical disability, which is projected to continue for a minimum of three weeks.  Physician verification is required.

Horizons

An innovative program designed for Special Education students who have struggled within the comprehensive high school setting.  One to one directed study, in combination with career/job training and transitions to work program, helps students gain academic skills while working toward a high school diploma or GED certificate and preparing for future employment.

Middle College

This is a model collaborative program between FUHSD and De Anza College designed to challenge 11th and 12th grade students who are academically very capable but, for a variety of reasons, are not performing up to their potential. Students benefit from the teaching and support services of both institutions.

Summer School

This is a six-week summer session for students within the Fremont Union High School District. The Summer School program is designed for students deficient in credits and/or skills required for high school graduation. Students may earn 5 to 10 credits during summer school.

Terra Nova

Terra Nova is a personalized learning community designed for 10th and 11th grade students who, while academically capable, have not performed well in the past. Located on the Cupertino High School (CHS) campus, the program is for high potential students still within the reach of graduation. Factors impacting their success may include social, emotional or family issues. All Terra Nova students are assigned to an advisor and have access to a licensed therapist. Academic classes with Terra Nova instructors include: 10th grade English, World History, and Study Skills; 11th grade English and Study Skills. Students have the opportunity to take additional classes on the CHS campus as well.

VISTAS

An alternative education program located in the Educational Options Center designed for 11th or 12th grade students who lack a connection to high school, are significantly behind in credits and/or are not going to graduate.  Students should be open to considering multiple options during the program: GED; CHSPE; ROP; certificate programs available through community college or Adult Education; and/or transition to work.

Work Experience Education

Students who are employed may choose to enroll in Work Experience with priority given to seniors whose graduation is at risk.  Each campus has a staff member who coordinates the program.  Throughout their time in the program, students develop and complete various components of a structured portfolio, which show the abilities, knowledge, and skills gained through Work Experience.  Credit is granted on a semester basis and based on a combination of completion of related instruction, attendance at class meetings, employer/teacher evaluations, and hours of employment.

Young Parent Program

A voluntary alternative program intended to meet the special needs of pregnant or parenting teens.  Academic instruction, cooperative parenting classes and case management help students develop good parenting skills, understand the developmental patterns of a child and prepare for a productive adult life while seeking a high school diploma or GED certificate.  Free childcare is provided while students are in class. Students attend school from 9:00 am-1:30 pm daily.